Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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Healthcare email marketing best practices for doctors

Healthcare email marketing best practices for doctors | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Think email marketing isn’t an effective way to connect with patients? Think again. The number of active email accounts worldwide has soared from 4.1 billion in 2014 to an expected 5.6 billion by the end of 2019, according to Statista.

 

Furthermore, consumers spend an average of 2.5 hours checking personal email each weekday, according to the Adobe 2018 Consumer Email Survey.

 

When properly executed, email is a valuable component of a healthcare marketing strategy. Read on for 10 healthcare email marketing best practices so you can effectively reach patients.

1. Say no to spam

On average, 24.16 percent of emails are delivered to spam folders on a monthly basis, according to a study of 55 organizations conducted by EveryAction. Unfortunately, your healthcare marketing emails can land in spam folders, even if patients signed up to receive them.

A few tips to bypass the spam filter include:

  • Avoiding spam words and phrases such as “100% free,” “best price,” “promise,” and “save.”
  • Building your own email list instead of working with an outside party.
  • Properly authenticating your emails, so inbox providers know you’re legitimate.
  • Cleaning up your email list on a regular basis because ignored emails lower your engagement rate, jeopardizing your standing with internet service providers.
  • Including a double opt-in because patients who want to be subscribed will boost your engagement and delivery rates.
  • Creating a preference center, where patients can decide what type of content they want to receive from you and how often.

2. Hit the right frequency

The most preferred mode by far, 50 percent of people prefer to communicate with brands by email, according to the Adobe survey. However, 45 percent said sending emails too often is the number one reason they unsubscribe from mailing lists.

 

You don’t want to overload inboxes, but reaching out too infrequently can also hurt your cause. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all formula, so take the time to figure out what works for your healthcare practice.

 

More than just a way to avoid spam, including a preference center — as noted above — is an easy way to ensure patients receive an optimal amount of emails.

3. Use segmenting

More than one-quarter of people (27 percent) want emails personalized to their interests, according to the Adobe survey. Every email campaign you create won’t apply to every patient on your list, so use segmenting to tailor messages to the correct audience.

 

For example, a dentist might send emails that include a discount on Zoom! teeth whitening to patients who have used at-home whitening strips, because the dentist knows these patients want whiter teeth but might be reluctant to pay high prices. The dentist wouldn’t send the discount to patients who have recently undergone Zoom! teeth whitening because these patients are willing to pay full price for the service.

 

Keeping patients informed on topics they’re interested in will boost your engagement rates.

4. Create different types of campaigns

Email marketing can take many different forms. An email campaign can provide educational messaging (i.e. summer skincare tips), promotional messaging (i.e. six Botox sessions for the price of five), seasonal greetings (i.e. Happy New Year!), or even be in the form of a monthly newsletter.

 

Serving up different types of content will engage and inform patients, keeping them interested in your emails.

5. Monitor the metrics

Patients might receive your emails, but that doesn’t mean they’re reading them. In fact, medical, dental, and healthcare emails have a 21.09 percent open rate and a 2.25 percent click rate, according to MailChimp.

 

Carefully monitoring key metrics like open rate, click rate, and bounce rate will allow you to know what’s working and what isn’t. After reviewing, you’ll be able to adjust your message accordingly.

6. Write an engaging subject line

The number of emails sent per day is expected to rise from 269 billion in 2017 to 347.3 billion in 2023, according to Statista. Clearly, your patients’ inboxes are filled with emails, so your subject line needs to stand out.

 

PatientPop advises keeping your subject line short, including your practice name, and avoiding “reminder” language (i.e. Remember to schedule your annual appointment).

7. Don’t forget to proofread

Plenty of factors go into a successful healthcare email marketing campaign, but none are as important as content. Spelling errors and poor grammar reflect poorly on your practice and make it hard for patients to take the message seriously.

 

Email content should be proofread by the person who wrote it, but don’t stop there. At least one other set of eyes needs to review it because it can be difficult for the author to spot mistakes since they’re so close to the content.

8. Include a call-to-action (CTA)

Nearly one-third of marketers (30 percent) cite email marketing and marketing automation as the digital marketing channel with the highest return on investment (ROI), according to Statista. Take advantage of this by crafting email content that incites patients to take action.

 

PatientPop recommends including call-to-action buttons such as “Book Online” or “Schedule Appointment.”

9. Time it right

In life and in email marketing, timing is everything. You could send the most engaging email patients will receive all day, but if it arrives in their inbox at the wrong time, it might not resonate.

 

Customarily, the best times to send emails are Tuesdays at 10 a.m. and Wednesdays at 2 p.m., according to PatientPop. Try sending your emails at these times and then check your open rates and click rates. Then, experiment with sending your emails at other times on other days to see how opens and clicks compare.

10. Get to the point

Your patients are busy people, so they don’t have time to read an email manifesto. Consequently, PatientPop advises keeping emails short and sweet. 

 

Short messages are also better for mobile. This is hugely important, considering 55 percent of email is opened on mobile devices, according to a study conducted by Return Path.

 

When properly executed, email marketing in healthcare is an effective way to keep in touch with patients and entice them to return to your practice — whether for checkups or other services.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Can Marketing Automation Help Doctors Improve their Patient Relationships?

Physician Dr. Sonia Henry recently published an article, on http://kevinmd.com, titled Doctors: Don’t lose your humanity, in which she discusses how important it is for professionals in the medical field to retain their humanity.

 

As Dr. Henry states:

A doctor without feeling is a canvas without a painting – the day we lose our ability to engage with our emotional responses to difficult situations is the day we lose our patients, even the ones who are still alive.”

Long before technology entered the fray, doctors risked losing that human-to-human interaction that’s needed in the medical field. But as technology has become prevalent in the field, it’s easier now, more than ever, for doctors to “lose their humanity” and forget that the people they’re dealing with are more than just patients.

Apps. Computer screens. Tablets. These devices and software are intended to improve the efficiency of the healthcare field, not dehumanize it.

Yet dehumanization is exactly what we risk unless we find ways to regain that doctor-patient relationship. This doesn’t mean foregoing technology; rather, it means finding ways to use technology to make the medical industry more personal.

That’s why marketing automation is so effective. Not only can it help your practice stay in-touch with your patients, but it can do so with very little effort on your part.

Improving your patient relationships with marketing automation

Unlike a retail business or another type of brand, patients actually wantto hear from, and know more about, the people in charge of their health. It’s far more welcoming for a patient to come see a doctor whom they feel they know, rather than a stranger they only hear from once a year or during a health scare.

With marketing automation, you can tear down the barrier that exists between you and your patients, while providing them content and information they actually value.

Here are a few ways to use automation to your advantage:

Emails

Take some time to create pre-made emails that you send to your patients based on certain parameters.

For example, your practice could have a setup in place that registers when patients come to your office. This system could then trigger a follow-up email to them a day or so following their visit that lets them know that if they have any specific questions or concerns to feel free to reach out to your team. This little follow up – that would be signed and sent by the doctor who saw them, is enough to make them feel like they were more than just a number.

While you’re at it, you could also encourage them to write a review on behalf of your practice, which would then improve your overall marketing efforts.

Nervous about getting bad reviews?

Not a problem. In your email to your patients, you could create a safeguard against negative reviews. Something like the image below is a good example of what you could do:

In this instance, if the patient clicks YES, they’ll be taken to a review site of your choosing (Healthgrades, Google, Facebook, etc.). If they click NO, they’ll be taken to a landing page where they can fill out a form to air their complaints. That form is sent directly to you, rather than going live to a review site.

There is no limit to the level of personalization you can do with your emails. You could have a standard follow-up email for every possible scenario your facility faces: annual checkups; emergency calls; parents of children, and so on.

You could then set up emails to mark certain milestones or events.

 

For example, it’s not uncommon for a car dealership to reach out to a car owner after a few years to remind them of the need for a tune-up.

You can take that same approach with your patients. For example, many health professionals believe that people should get their first colonoscopy at the age of 50. Since you have the date of births of your patients, you could trigger an email to patients who are nearing 50 that wishes them a happy birthday and reminds them that it’s time to consider scheduling a colonoscopy.

You could keep on providing health advice to your subscribers, based on their age, on the reason for their last visit to you, and more.

Newsletter

The average person interacts with their healthcare providers or specialists only when they have to. This type of relationship doesn’t forge a lasting bond of trust and transparency.

As a medical professional, you want to be seen as the trusted resource of medical information for your patients. You can achieve this through a periodic newsletter emailed to your patients.

Newsletters allow you to remain top-of-mind of your patients and provides your readers with valuable information.

Updates to your facility, healthy living tips, patient testimonials and stories – each of these can become a fabric of your organization’s newsletter. In fact, the content pieces that make up your newsletters can be used in many different ways for your marketing efforts.

 

For example, let’s say that you run a monthly newsletter for your hospital. As part of that newsletter, you conduct a Q&A each month on a different doctor. Aside from adding that Q&A in your newsletter, you can also post it on your website, and share it on social media.

In other words, your newsletter becomes the anchor of your content marketing efforts. All of the articles and social updates you post feature elements of your newsletter, but at the same time, serve to strengthen your relationship with your patients.

Below is one page from a newsletter published by North Cypress Medical Center of Texas:

 

You’ll see that this page focuses on Prostate Cancer Screening. Not only does it serve as an informational piece for readers, but it’s also valuable marketing: it promotes the hospital’s upcoming free screenings.

Regain that personal feel of your practice

It might seem ironic to look toward technology to get more personal with your patients, but that’s exactly what automation aims to do. By setting up workflows and processes up-front, you can engage in ongoing conversations with your patients, with little effort on your part. By reaching out to your patients with content they value, and that’s relevant to them, you’ll stand apart from other medical professionals and will build the trust that is so vital toward the patient-doctor relationship.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.