Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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Efficiency of Remote Clinical Documentation Improvement Work

Efficiency of Remote Clinical Documentation Improvement Work | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Would working remotely on clinical documentation improvement (CDI) improve efficiency at a healthcare organization? Some may not think so, but the results from Baystate Health indicate otherwise.

As part of its CDI program, Baystate Health in Springfield, Mass., began teaching CDI specialists to work from home with the help of health IT tools, according to the Journal of AHIMA.2014-10-15-Doc-at-PC

So far, working remotely has led to greater accuracy and efficiency among CDI employees. Several years ago, the organization began expanding its CDI hiring base and moving some staff members off-site.

By 2014, the CDI team rose from four specialists to ten. The original four workers were transitioned to working from home after establishing strong relationships with physicians and coders when working on-site. Both email and EHRs were used to run queries by CDI specialists working from home.

This allows providers to focus on their patients and get back to documentation questions afterward. Essentially, it brings better care to patients by preventing interruptions to workflow.

Often, CDI specialists work on hospital floors and ask physicians or nurses directly about queries, but supervisors explain that little has changed by allowing this work-from-home program. The health information management department has also developed software that allows CDI workers and coders to communicate about cases and records.

Another useful tool that simplifies working remotely is an instant messaging platform the organization incorporated. This system-wide messaging capability allows CDI specialists to pose questions and manage issues with anyone from Baystate Health, whether it is the billing department, the health information management department, or medical and surgery.

“We don’t interrupt the productivity of our individuals by having them pair or mentor off another individual, but we use these tools to understand where the variations lie and where there’s other opportunities,” Jennifer Cavagnac, CCDS, Assistant Director of Clinical Documentation Improvement at Baystate Health, told the news source.

One of the main reasons that the organization introduced working remotely was to improve job satisfaction. Moral in the workplace rose due to increased flexibility. This also led to better retainment of top CDI employees.

Cavagnac goes on to explain that team members who work remotely are encouraged to communicate with the rest of the team and ask questions about cases in order to keep them connected to the workplace. The supervisors attempt to ensure workers don’t feel isolated and that resources are available even when working remotely.

Technology like instant messaging, EHR systems, and telehealth services has not only allowed employees to work remotely but also enabled patients to receive basic healthcare assistance outside of a medical office.

The Federal Times reported that caregivers are able to reach patients on a daily basis through telehealth services but a more integrated system will need to be developed so that patient data can be stored securely and shared in real time.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) began a telehealth network four years ago in order to provide healthcare services in rural areas without a strong hospital system. The medical industry will continue to adapt and improve technologies such as videoconferencing, image storing, and wireless communication in order to strengthen the capabilities of telehealth.

Whether it is to increase work flexibility or improve telehealth services for patients around the nation, technology plays a vital role in connecting individuals across the healthcare spectrum.


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Keeping Employees Happy During System Implementations

Keeping Employees Happy During System Implementations | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Implementing a new patient management system is a huge investment in terms of time and dollars. It can also be very stressful on all involved. Changes in the healthcare climate often contribute to an organization’s decision to implement a new system in an effort to meet current and future healthcare mandates. New systems often offer technology that is more technically advanced and robust, causing concerns among employees about their ability to learn new functions and workflows in a relatively short amount of time. These concerns often result in real and imagined barriers to staff adapting to the change. So how do you get employee buy-in during a system implementation?

Foster Employee Involvement

In any organization, change is better received when not strictly mandated downward. It is important to create an environment that allows employees to feel that they are a part of the decision making process. The transition to a new system can be successful when opportunities are developed for active engagement among the management and staff. Several steps should be taken to encourage participation and keep employees engaged during this time of significant change, while still keeping the timeline and projected costs in check. We recommend the following:

  • Create a workgroup to categorize, review and understand current state policies and procedures.
  • Create a repository for the existing policies and procedures. Review these policies often throughout the system development and implementation phases. The goal should be to identify gaps and opportunities between current state and future state.
  • Be ready to share. Hold monthly “town hall” meetings during the build phase to provide staff with glimpses of the new system and provide information about next steps, answer questions and concerns.
  • Develop training that is role-based and centered on policy and procedure workflows. It is not uncommon for end users to be highly stressed at the thought of learning and adapting to a new system. Providing training specified on workflows creates a real world environment, allowing users to practice scenarios that are relevant to their job role and improving their comfort level.

Cultivate System Champions

In order to be successful, it is imperative that there is involvement from different employee groups that utilize the system, both non-clinical and clinical. Often, organizations approach a project of this magnitude with a rigid project management stance in order to keep the project timeline and budget intact. Not enough time is spent on gathering “buy in” and system acceptance to reduce the anxiety of the staff that is most impacted. I Involving staff early and often can pay huge dividends in terms of buy-in, satisfaction and timeline. We recommend the following strategies:

  • Map current workflows from start to finish with the aid of designated staff who utilize the functionality
  • Ask staff to list opportunities for improvement and identify workflows that are currently working well.
  • Review workflows for redundancy and encourage new ways of looking at an old issue or process. There are always different ways to obtain the same result. Avoid the all too common idea of, “we’ve always done it this way.”
  • Create access to the new system that is based on user role, testing and training by role. This way, people can learn in an environment that mirrors production. This will greatly decrease potential end user frustration.
  • Choose staff from each modalitythat can act as “super users” who are willing and ready to:
    • Disseminate positive information to his/her department
    • Bring questions and concerns back to implementation team
    • Help develop/update policies and procedures based on new system workflows and best practices
    • Help users understand the new system functionality by utilizing the approved workflows defined at the beginning of the project

Involving staff is important, not only to gain insight into job functions and activities but also to create system champions excited for change.

Participation, Not Delegation

System implementations can be both exciting and exasperating at the same time. Involving staff in a strategic way will improve the overall end result. Allowing staff to have input will ensure that all end user needs have been identified, reviewed, streamlined and implemented if appropriate. Staff buy-in will be heightened if employees feel they are involved. Allow for input, understand current processes, and track employee feedback regarding both current pain points and needs when developing a system implementation strategy.


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DrChrono helps small medical practices use iPads for patient records

DrChrono helps small medical practices use iPads for patient records | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Michael Nusimow and Daniel Kivatinos were college friends at SUNY Stony Brook on Long Island. Then Michael went to work at Bloomberg, while Daniel studied further before joining New York startups. When Michael took his father to hospitals and doctors, he was frustrated by how inefficiently patient data was handled. In some cases, paper forms needed to be filled out repeatedly. At another site, a doctor had a terminal, but he was so busy typing he hardly had time to look at the patient. Despite recent improvements to document interchange standards, sharing data between different medical institutions can be difficult given incompatible systems, complicated workflows and privacy concerns.

So Michael and Daniel decided that doctors could perform much more effectively with a web-based system. Initially, they started by automating patient communications. Their system would remind people of appointments with text and email messages. Then they added billing and interfaces to existing financial systems, learning requirements as they visited small ambulatory doctors' practices. They launched DrChrono in 2009.
 
According to Black Book Rankings, in 2008, only 12% of office practices had even the most basic electronic health record (EHR) systems. By 2014, 51% of office-based practices were using a fully functional EHR systems, and 82% had basic electronic medical records.

In 2010, the iPad was launched. A tablet enables a doctor to face a patient while taking notes. Also in 2010, the government was moving to make Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems more open. So DrChrono decided to build an EHR system from scratch that would work on iPads. They launched their new system in 2010 at a Health 2.0 conference in Florida. It was an exciting time. Instead of struggling to sell a web-based system, Michael and Daniel closed deals at the conference as doctors enthusiastically saw the iPad's potential.

DrChrono applied to join Y Combinator's funding program, which Michael describe as being like "a startup's coming out ball". The program requires three months intense work in Silicon Valley. So Michael thought he would come to Silicon Valley for about six months. However, the experience was so transformative, that he started raising money and hiring employees in Mountain View. The company is currently based near 101 and Rengstorff.

DrChrono focuses on making small medical practices more efficient. The system manages forms securely, submits insurance claims, schedules patients, enables email correspondence, helps doctors manage inventory, transcribes medical notes, checks for drug interactions and handles prescriptions. The doctor can share diagnostic images, from X-rays, for example on an iPad with a patient.

Patients can download an app, On Patient, to track their health and share information with their doctor. It works on both Apple or Android platforms and is only useful if your doctor has the iPad DrChrono system. On iOS8 devices it works with Apple's HealthKit, that integrates information from other health-related apps and displays them using Apple's Health app. If you have a newer iPhone or iPad you might want to check that your fitness and health apps are set to share information with Apple Health.

The company is constantly looking for technologies that can help doctors and tried offering Google Glass. The display in the glasses was useful for certain types of doctors like surgeons, who need hands free information. In general, most doctors found tablets more useful. Wearable devices to track heart rates, exercise and more will transform the doctor/patient relationship as their output is fed into doctors' systems. Michael quoted Vinod Khosla who notes on his blog that over time 80% of what a doctor does can be replaced by smart hardware, software and testing, with technology also improving a doctor's ability to perform.

The Electronic Health Records space is crowded and fragmented. DrChrono started by bootstrapping and has been extraordinarily capital efficient, compared with San Francisco's Practice Fusion, which has raised $134M from investors that include Kleiner Perkins and other big name firms. With major companies like GE, McKesson and Quest Diagnostics in the market, and many fast growing startups chasing for market share, DrChrono is racing to hire software engineers and customer relations staff so it can keep ahead of the game.


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