Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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5 proven tactics for long-term healthcare SEO success

5 proven tactics for long-term healthcare SEO success | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

How to boost your healthcare website’s local search engine ranking

1. Use localized keywords

Incorporating the right keywords throughout your website content is one of the most important elements of healthcare SEO. Start by conducting keyword research to see what your prospective patients search for when looking for a practice like yours.

 

For example, a podiatry practice in Glendale, AZ, might use keyword phrases like [podiatrist glendale], [ankle sprain glendale], and [ingrown toenail glendale]. Just be mindful when choosing keywords, as keyword stuffing — i.e. aimlessly filling a page with keywords in an effort to boost your ranking — can negatively affect your rank.

 

A study conducted by Ahrefs revealed that sites commonly rank for two to three keywords with more than 1,000 searches per month.

 

However, they rarely rank for more than one keyword with more than 10,000 searches per month. Keep this in mind when deciding which keywords — and how many — to weave into copy.

2. Create individual service pages

Your practice offers a variety of services to patients. Make sure each gets the attention it deserves by dedicating a page on your healthcare website to it.

 

This is a crucial element of SEO for doctors because it will allow each page to rank for the specific service noted. It also makes it easier for search engines to crawl your site because it creates a more organized site map.

 

The same rule applies to practices with multiple locations. If your practice has more than one office, boost local search results by creating a separate page for each location.

3. Publish blog posts

Not only does blogging engage your patient base, it’s also an important SEO for medical technique. Crafting informative blog posts on a regular basis takes time, but it’s worth the effort.

 

According to HubSpot, blogging boosts your SEO rank by positioning your site as relevant to patient questions.

 

The company recommends creating evergreen content and repurposing or updating it as needed to keep the information current.

4. Practice backlinking

If you’re not familiar with backlinking, it’s the process of obtaining links from other websites back to your healthcare website. This is important for healthcare SEO because search engines use links to help determine your page rank.

 

In addition to scanning page content, search engines look at the number and quality of links pointing to the page from external websites.

 

Typically, the more high-quality websites that link to your page, the better your chances of scoring a competitive ranking.

5. Optimize page speeds

Site speed has been a Google ranking factor since 2010. It’s not as significant as some other factors — like page relevance — but it’s important to pay attention to all elements that play into your SEO ranking.

 

Google recommends having a time-to-first-byte — i.e. the amount of time the page takes to start loading — of less than 1.3 seconds.

 

A slow page speed also means search engines can crawl fewer pages with their crawl budget, according to Moz.

 

Page speed is also a user experience issue. The average mobile landing page takes approximately 15 seconds to load, according to Google.

 

This isn’t good, considering 53 percent of mobile visitors leave a page with a load speed greater than three seconds.

 

Healthcare SEO isn’t a one-time effort. Long-term success requires an ongoing time commitment — one you can’t afford to ignore. Your website visibility depends on its search engine ranking, so give it the attention it deserves.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Healthcare website promises doctors should be wary of

Healthcare website promises doctors should be wary of | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

7 healthcare website promises that should make you think twice

1. “You don’t need a responsive site.”

As of February 2019, 81 percent of Americans own a smartphone, according to the Pew Research Center. Furthermore, GSMA Intelligence predicts 3.7 billion people — 72 percent of global internet users — will access the internet using only mobile devices by 2025.

 

Given these numbers, it’s clear patients are using a variety of devices to access your site. Therefore, having a responsive medical website is a must, as it adjusts to fit the screen size of the device. This allows all patients to enjoy an optimal viewing experience.

2. “Anyone can build a website that can be found in search.”

Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise: Creating a medical website that ranks highly in search requires vast search engine optimization (SEO) knowledge.

 

This isn’t easy, as nearly two-thirds of companies (61 percent) cite generating traffic and leads as their top marketing challenge, according to HubSpot.

 

You can have the most amazing healthcare website, but it’s essentially useless if people can’t find it. In fact, three-quarters (75 percent) of people don’t look past the first page of Google search results, according to Moz.

3. “Website content can be written by anyone.”

Bad content can ruin an otherwise amazing healthcare website. In fact, nearly half of consumers (44 percent) won’t purchase from a brand if its content is too wordy or poorly written, according to Adobe.

 

Content should be written during the website design process. Consider it a red flag if your web designer doesn’t make it a priority or suggests having anyone but a professional copywriter do the work.

 

4. “Web design tools will build a great site.”

Easy-to-use web design tools seemingly make it possible for anyone to create a website. However, there’s no comparison between a site made with one of these tools and one created by a seasoned web designer.

 

If building a quality healthcare website was easy, everyone would do it. Working with an experienced web designer is the only way to get a finished product your business deserves.

5. “Your website only needs to work on Chrome.”

At 49.35 percent market share as of November 2019, according to Statcounter, Chrome is the most popular internet browser in the U.S. There’s a 50-50 chance your patients are using Chrome, but if they’re not, you still want them to have an outstanding user experience. 

Making sure your healthcare website is compatible with all browsers is a must because it could cause you to lose out on new business. If prospective patients visit your website using a browser other than Chrome, they’ll probably move on to your competitor if it doesn’t function properly.

6. “A lack of healthcare experience doesn’t matter.”

No one can be an expert at everything. Be cautious of web designers who claim they can create an outstanding medical website despite having few or no healthcare clients.

 

Sure, any experienced web designer might be able to create a website that’s attractive and functional. However, a professional with specialized healthcare industry experience will be better equipped to know exactly what your practice website needs.

 

After all, podiatrists and ophthalmologists are both doctors, but you wouldn’t go to the latter to have a foot fracture treated.

7. “Your website will be completed ASAP.”

If your current healthcare website is seriously lacking — or nonexistent — you want a new one as soon as possible. However, quality websites aren’t built overnight. 

 

For example, it takes an average of three hours and 57 minutes just to create one blog post, according to Orbit Media. That’s only one piece of content, so be wary of a web designer who promises to complete your site in a matter of days.

 

They should provide you with a clear implementation process that details the work they’ll be doing — and the timeline — from start to finish.

 

This gets the two of you on the same page from the beginning and allows you to know exactly what they’re doing.

 

Your healthcare website should make you proud. Carefully vet the company you work with to create it to ensure it meets the quality standards your practice deserves. 

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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The Beginner’s Guide to Online Review Management

The Beginner’s Guide to Online Review Management | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The Beginner’s Guide to Online Review Management

Make a List

Before you can begin your online review management and improvement, you have to know what you’re up against. Block out some time to do some research and audit your online business reputation. To start, search for your business as a customer might. What comes up first? Your website? Your Facebook Page? Your Google Business listing? A third-party site? Are these reviews reliable and made by real customers?

 

You’ll probably come across some negative reviews, but don’t worry about addressing them yet. At this stage, simply try to gather as much information as you can. In your list, record the following information about each result you find:

  • URL
  • Search engine results page (SERP) position
  • Number of reviews listed
  • Overall star-rating and/or overall sentiment (positive, negative, neutral)
  • Reviews appear to be made by real customers (or not)
  • Information within the reviews is accurate (or not)
  • Complaints in the reviews have been addressed (or not)

 

After the first page of results, do a quick scan to see if there are any particularly problematic results, like a blog post or local news story defaming your business. If you find these, add them to your list. If not, stick to the first page of results. Since most customers don’t scroll past the first page of results, it’s probably not worth your time to go past the first page either.

Prioritize Online Review Sources

At this point, you probably have 8 to 10 items on your online review management list. Most likely, you don’t have the time to manage all of these. Choose the sources that are most impactful, and prioritize managing those first.

Look at your research from the previous step and find which sites showed up first, which scores were bad, or any reviews that were obviously false. If any of the sites that showed up had ten or more positive reviews, you might skip these and move on to more urgent items. Remember your own website is important here too, especially if it shows up high on the SERP.

Established Businesses

If you’re a well-established business, you may find that you already have a number of positive reviews across a variety of sites. After all, you’ve been around this long because you do a good job and customers like you! In this case, you may want to take a closer look at the ROI of online reputation management. Your strategy can always be stronger, and you can reach more customers with well-placed reviews. To start, look for holes in your online reviews; are there any places customers are looking for you, but not finding you? If you don’t have a Facebook page, website, or other top online listings, these should be your priority.

New Businesses

New businesses may find a few relevant results to start. That’s okay. A clean slate is good; you have the opportunity to control the conversation around your business. You’ll want to prioritize the top spots on the SERP. Ideally, these will be your Google Business listing, website, and Facebook page. You can control some parts of what appears on your Google Business listing and Facebook page, and every aspect of your website, so make sure this information is accurate, and your SEO is good. If you don’t have any reviews in these places yet, this is a good place to start.    

Gather more reviews

Now that you have the information you need, you’ll need to bolster the reviews on your top-priority sites. Make a plan to gather more testimonials and direct customers to the site to post their reviews. There are several ways to do this, and which you choose will depend on where you want to gather more reviews and how you best interact with your customers. Here are a few ways you can ask for reviews;

  • Automated email campaign
  • In-store tablet or kiosk
  • Facebook campaign
  • Customer appreciation event
  • Contest or giveaway
  • Other unconventional ways

With the right plan, you can automate your testimonial gathering process in under one hour. Check out the Step-by-Step Guide to Automating Testimonial Collection.

Manage Your Online Reviews

If you have some reviews coming in through emails, some on YouTube, some on Facebook, and a number of other places, it’s going to get difficult to manage. Focus your reviews into one easy-to-use platform, and make sure customers know where to go to submit them. If you use Boast, you can request, gather, approve, and display text and video testimonials all in one place. You’ll also want to use a platform that integrates with your WordPress website, Facebook page, MailChimp account, and other services so you can use the reviews that you gather in more places. With these integrations, you can continue to manage your online reviews from one place, but use them in many different ways.

Monitor Your Online Reviews

Nothing online remains unchanged for very long, and your online reputation is no different. After you boost your reputation on your top-priority sites, including your own website, you’ll want to monitor these sites. You can set up Google Alerts with your company name as a keyword to see when new mentions go up anywhere online. It’s also a good idea to check back on your review sites periodically and thank customers who post reviews, and respond (where appropriate) to negative reviews or issues. Finally, keep gathering, posting and using testimonials in new ways. Some of the top brands in the world use testimonials to maintain their industry authority, engage customers, build community, and build trust.

 

Once you have a plan to manage online reviews, the process won’t seem so chaotic. Remember that building (or repairing) your reputation takes time, consistent effort, and exemplary service. If you continue to impress your customers and make it easy for them to show their approval, you’ll start to see more reviews rolling in.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Physician Online Reputation Management in 2018

Physician Online Reputation Management in 2018 | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

A few years ago, when we first wrote about online physician reputation management there were fewer people writing and reading reviews, especially for physicians and other healthcare experiences. The tide has turned since then and now we're seeing that physician reviews are playing a significant role in the selection of a healthcare provider. Did you know that:

 

  • At least 77% of patients use online reviews as their first step in finding a new doctor. - Software Advice
  • 53% of providers looked at physician review websites, likely to understand their patients’ experiences and to improve their practices. - Journal of General Internal Medicine

 

What do you need to do for your reviews to be visible and show positive interactions with patients? 

 

HOW DO CONSUMERS USE ONLINE PHYSICIAN REVIEWS?

 

The truth is we often use them without intending to. When I searched my general practitioner on Google, the physician's website was fourth in the search results, plus there's a huge box at the right on the desktop to feature him in Google. Many won't even get to his website to see what they have to say before exposure to many different reviews, as you see here.

 

We also naturally tend to gravitate towards sites we know and already trust like Health Grades or Yelp. Both of those beat the practice's own site in search results for this doctor. 

 

HOW MUCH DO ONLINE PHYSICIAN REVIEWS AFFECT A PATIENT’S DECISION?

 

Bright Local reports that in 2017, among those who look at online reviews, 68% said a positive review makes them trust a business more.  And negative reviews have almost as big of an effect in the opposite direction with 40% saying that a negative review makes them not want to use that business. 

 

In 2016, the National Research Corporation reported that 47% of consumers indicated that a doctor’s online reputation matters. This percentage is tied with the restaurant industry for #1 among all local business types.

 

The short answer: Physician online reviews matter. A lot.

 

WHAT TO DO IF YOUR REVIEWS AREN'T ALL FIVE-STARS?

 

If every doctor in the practice has a 4 or 5 star rating on all of the various review sites being monitored by your service provider – then rock on! You don't really need to do much other than just keep on doing what you do. 

 

The sad reality is that no matter how good our intentions we sometimes don't see eye to eye and that can cause a negative review to get published. Here are a few steps to take when a less-than-stellar review shows up online:

 

1) Pause before responding

It's a very personal feeling when you see someone comment about you and your life's work in a negative way. Remember, your response can actually make things worse if it's not carefully crafted and all facts taken into consideration. You don't want to leave a public record of an argument with anyone on a third party website.

 

2) Reach out directly

Whenever possible we recommend the practice call that patient right away and have the discussion offline. That way when you respond online later to state that you saw this and addressed with Mr. X privately because he is very important to you.

 

3) Never delete the bad reviews

You don't want to be accused of trying to manipulate how your reptuation looks by removing anything that's negative. When every review is 5-stars, consumers are likely to  sense that you're curating the results to only show the best ones. You can also start a firestorm on social media if you remove a negative review rather than respond to it publicly. 

 

Whether you do it yourself or you engage a reputation management service, negative reviews should not be ignored. If you’re starting to see a few comments that aren’t as positive as you’d like, it could be a flag that someone at your practice is not interacting well with patients. Or perhaps there’s a problem with your operational flow that has caused some discontent. These are things that can easily be addressed, improving your patient experience and reducing further harm to your personal reputation! 

 

TIPS FOR INCREASING POSITIVE ONLINE PHYSICIAN REVIEWS

1) Use a Service for Online Reputation Monitoring and Reporting

 

Using a service makes it easier to stay on top of what's out there so that you and your staff aren't blind-sided by a negative review. We recommend that you use a service that monitors everything and gives you a regular report or a dashboard you can access at any time. They can also help mitigate some negative reviews from appearing publicly.

 

Your review service can often help with removal of a review, especially if PHI is being revealed. Ask us if you're not sure what kind of review services are out there and what you get with each.

 

2) Make it Someon'e Job to Make Updates and Address Reviews 

 

It's not enough to know what's out there, you'll also need hands to help correct things and address items as they come up in reviews. Most of the online review collection services do not review and update the data. They only aggregate it for you. If you don't have someone you can assign to this, let us know.

 

If you don't choose an online reputation management service, be sure to pay particular attention to these five physician review websites:

  • Healthgrades.com
  • Yelp.com
  • Vitals.com
  • WebMD.com
  • RateMDs.com

Facebook could also play a role if you have reviews enabled on your business' page.

 

3) Do Not Submit Reviews on Behalf of Your Patients

 

Don't do anything that could potentially look like you're stuffing the reviews. Consumers will become suspicious if they see this.  Avoid asking your spouse or children to review you, as well as your employees. You really need actual patients to submit their reviews. Use a follow up email to give them a link for reviews. Some services offer a texting following where reviews can be submitted. 

 

REFERRING PHYSICIANS USE ONLINE REVIEWS

We mentioned at the start that other providers are reading the reviews, especially for physicians they may refer to. While your best referral sources typically know you personally, they want to be sure that their patients are going to find good things about you online, knowing that about three-fourths of them will do a check of the reviews.

Also, be sure your listings and reviews show the correct office address so that your referral sources feel confident that when they refer you their patients can find you.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Reputation reboot: Doctor's guide to salvaging a poor reputation

Reputation reboot: Doctor's guide to salvaging a poor reputation | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

5 doctor reputation management concerns — and how to resolve them

1. An inappropriate online review

A whopping 97 percent of people who read online reviews also read businesses’ responses to reviews, according to BrightLocal. An overwhelming majority (71 percent) say they’re more likely to use a business that has responded to their reviews.

 

Given these numbers, the importance of taking action cannot be emphasized enough. If a review is fake or fraudulent — i.e. it is clearly spam or it is a review by a competitor — contact the review site it’s posted on and explain the situation. You might be able to have it removed if it’s clearly fake or vulgar in nature.

 

However, don’t panic if you’re unable to have the review taken down. As noted above, people will read your response to review, so write a calm and collected reply, if necessary, that shows you’re a class act.

2. Someone else claims or populates a directory profile

Claiming, completing, and monitoring directory profiles should be a part of your online reputation management strategy. Realizing someone else has access to — or complete control of — a profile with your practice name on it is undoubtedly alarming.

 

Every site has its own process for dealing with these issues, so you’ll need to reach out to the customer service team immediately.

 

They should be able to help you figure out what’s going on and return exclusive access back to the rightful owner: you.

3. An incorrect response to a question on Google Q&A

The Google Q&A feature allows people to quickly and easily ask questions about your business. Both questions and answers are displayed on your Google My Business page, which can be helpful — if they’re answered correctly.

 

Finding an incorrect response can be alarming, so take swift action to have it removed. Click “more” next to the answer, then click “report” to alert Google of the false information.

 

In the meantime, replying to the question as your business is a great doctor reputation management strategy. The correct response from the business owner should set the record straight and negate the false information provided by the other user.

 

4. Several negative comments from a social media troll

It’s important for your practice to have a presence on popular social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Unfortunately, this opens the door to trolls who want to cause problems for your practice.

 

Having a plan in place to deal with trolls is an essential part of reputation management for doctors. The best approach to take often varies by situation, but a polite reply — or none at all — is generally the smartest route.

 

Unless the troll uses profanity or other languages that’s offensive in nature, it’s typically best not to delete their comments.

 

5. A poor star rating

Only 53 percent of people will consider using a business with less than four stars, according to BrightLocal. Don’t panic if your star rating falls below this mark, however, because you can turn things around.

 

Send patient satisfaction surveys after each visit to find out what you’re doing well and where there’s room for improvement. Give satisfied patients the opportunity to share their feedback publicly, as each positive review will help bump your star rating up to an impressive level.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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How to Measure the ROI of Online Reputation Management

How to Measure the ROI of Online Reputation Management | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

How to Measure the ROI of Online Reputation Management

Overall, online reputation management means creating more positive, trustworthy sentiment around your brand, and removing or displacing negative sentiment. This sentiment comes from three main areas online; social media, referrals, and review sites. We’ll address the ROI of each of these online reputation management strategies individually. This way you can tackle them one by one, or pick and choose the areas that are most important to your business or your client.

Social Media

Social media is a big part of online reputation management for many people, businesses and brands. And even if you don’t use social media, your customers and potential customers do. That means you’re probably getting mentioned—either positive or negative—whether you see them or not.

To measure the ROI of online reputation management in social media, you first need a baseline. There are a few different KPIs you can choose to get a starting social media score.

 

  • Followers: Whether you’re looking at Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or another platform, followers are a fairly good indicator of customer approval on social media. According to Sprout Social, your followers are about 57% more likely to be customers. Keep in mind that bots and other businesses will skew your organic follower numbers somewhat.
  • Engagement: Likes, retweets, reposts, mentions, comments and other types of engagement are also a measure of social media approval. This, like followers, is a fairly easy number to gauge and requires only basic social media monitoring services. However, remember that not all engagement is positive.
  • Sentiment: This may be the most difficult social media KPI to measure, but it’s also the most accurate assessment of online reputation management on social media. If your total mentions and engagement are relatively low, you can skim through your mentions to get an average or set up keyword filters including your brand name and positive or negative words. Social media management programs like Hootsuite or Sprout Social also have special algorithms to measure the public’s view of your company on social media.
  • Traffic: The total website or store traffic you get from social media isn’t a direct link to your social reputation. However, it is an important metric for measuring ROI. This means you’ll want to measure traffic from social alongside one or more of the previous three reputation indicators. You might use tracking codes, link click-through rates, or Google Analytics to measure your traffic from social media.

If your social score could use some improvement, devise an online reputation management campaign on social. You might hire an agency or new staff person to respond to mentions and solve problems, work with influencers online to improve your image or make a focused social media campaign around a hashtag or trend. Determine how much this campaign will cost.

 

You can measure the ROI of online reputation management through social media using improvements to your traffic and social score. For example, if your engagement grew 100%, traffic from social media increased by 50% and your average conversion rate is 5%, total sales increased by 2.5%. This also indicates that a 100% increase in engagement means a 2.5% in sales. To measure your ROI, divide this increase in sales by the total amount spent on online reputation management.

 

— Harness the power of video testimonials to raise your reputation via social media. Access free templates to get started » —

Referrals

Referrals are less noticeable because they are generally not searchable, like reviews, and they’re not public, like social media. However, research shows that consumers are 4 times more likely to buy when they receive a referral from a friend.

If you have a high customer churn, referrals might not be a relevant online reputation management strategy for you. However, if you have a smaller group of loyal, satisfied, repeat customers, referrals are very important.

Just like social media, you’ll need a referral baseline before you can measure the ROI of this online reputation management strategy. Also like social media, there are a few methods you can use to do this.

  • Referral links: When a customer completes a purchase and you send them a follow-up email, send a link that they can share with friends. You can measure the click-through rates on the link itself, or leads from a referral page.
  • Satisfaction survey: Ask your customers how they feel about your business and brand. Specifically, ask if they would recommend your company to a friend. This is metric is also known as your Net Promoter Score.
  • Referral Program: Incentivize your customer and their contacts with a referral program. Track how many existing and new customers take part.

If you don’t currently have referrals or if your Net Promoter Score is low, you’ll need a strategy for improving it. Or, if customers are unlikely to refer you, ask about their buying experience, and address any problems. If customers would refer you, but aren’t, make it easy for them to spread the word, and give them an incentive. Advertise your referral program as well. Determine how much these efforts will cost.

 

To determine the ROI of this online reputation management strategy, track the sales from referral links, landing pages, or programs. Lifetime customer value will also be an important factor. Some estimates say lifetime referred customer value is about 16% higher than other customers. Along with sales, you’ll want to reassess your Net Promoter Score with another survey after executing your reputation management strategy. Just as before, divide your total increase in sales by the amount you spent to find the ROI of this online reputation management strategy.

Review Sites

For some businesses, such as restaurants, contractors, or dentists, review sites will play the most important part of online reputation management. Measuring the ROI of this online reputation management strategy is more difficult since you can’t track these sites or directly measure their effect. However, research and data projections can offer some guidance.

 

A study by Harvard Business School showed that local businesses that increased their overall review rating by one star saw a 5 to 9% increase in revenue. With this data, you can estimate ROI from increasing your star-rating on popular review sites like Google or Yelp. Divide a projected increase in revenue by the amount you will spend on improving your reviews to get ROI. Use the following formula to get a cautiously optimistic estimate. You could also substitute .07 with .05 or .09 to get a low or high estimate, respectively.

[Original Revenue x .07] – Original Revenue = Revenue Increase
Revenue Increase / Total spent = ROI

Start with a modest goal of a one-star improvement. If you have just a few reviews, it won’t take many five-star experiences to make a significant impact. Read your reviews and address any problems that come up frequently. If you believe a competitor or someone else is posting fake reviews about you, contact the site or respond to the review and explain the situation. Encourage customers to post reviews, but remember to stay within legal guidelines and the site’s rules.

Other Content

In some cases, you may have other content to contend with, like blog posts, news items, watchdog websites like Ripoff Report or Consumer Affairs, or even competitor sites. If negative articles like these are high on search results, you should consider this a top priority in online reputation management.

 

The effect of negative articles depends mostly on how trustworthy the source is and how easy it is to find. If the source is well established and the article is on the first page of search results when you search for your company name or related terms, the effect can be very noticeable. According to Moz, one negative article indicates a 22% customer loss, and two means losing almost half.

 

Keep in mind that these aren’t just bad reviews by unhappy customers. These are bloggers, journalists, or other writers who went out of their way to either reveal a real problem or defame your business. If the story is untrue, consider taking legal action with a libel case. If the story is true and you’ve fixed the problem, address it, and then work at repairing your reputation.

 

Estimating the ROI on this online reputation management strategy is fairly straight forward. If you can remove or displace the negative article from the first page of results, you can estimate a 22% traffic increase. If this also boosts your own website to a higher spot in the search engine results page (SERP), you can expect additional traffic increases. From there, apply your conversion rates and sales to get your ROI.

Your online reputation is affecting your business, whether you’re aware of it or not. The first step to mending your online reputation is fixing the problem, whether that’s customer experience, product quality, or libelous competitors. The next step is making a repair plan, and executing it in a way that supports ROI. With an online reputation management strategy that is ethically and financially responsible, you can bring in loyal, lifelong customers for years to come.

 
Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Reputation Management for Doctors in 3 Easy Steps

Reputation Management for Doctors in 3 Easy Steps | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Doctors, practices, and their staff all have a brand. And like any brand, it must be protected.

 

I’ve spent years helping struggling doctors grow revenue and find more time in their day, and I’ve discovered that when you have a strong brand, patients engage more, and they’re willing to invest with less analysis, cynicism, and caution.

 

Think of strong brands such as Nike, Apple, and Coca-Cola. Branding is more about the perception of excellence than about the perception of a good deal.

 

That’s the perception you want for your practice. And that’s why you need a strong brand.

 

Negative press will instantly and immeasurably harm a brand. To avoid this, doctors should consider reputation management to help protect their brand.

 

Here, we’ll take a look at what that means for you and how you can get started protecting your brand in three easy steps.

What is reputation management?

Reputation management means knowing what’s being said about you and taking a proactive response to enter the conversation constructively.

But how do you know what people are saying?

Patients and prospective patients primarily use online search results, review sites, and social media to evaluate and find new doctors.

According to a Software Advice survey:

  • Eighty-four percent of patient respondents use online reviews to evaluate physicians
  • For 77% of respondents, reading online reviews is the first step taken when searching for a new doctor
  • Favorable reviews would motivate 47% of respondents to choose an out-of-network doctor with similar qualifications over one with less favorable reviews

In addition to the myriad reviews websites out there, there are also forums, Twitter, and Facebook where people may be talking about you, your staff, and your practice.

Is reputation management worth the effort?

Regularly monitoring your web results may seem like a daunting task.

After all, according to a 2012 article in the Annals of Family Medicine, the average primary care physician has about 2,300 patients under their care at any one time. And they’re all online.

But—think about Amazon. How many products have you not bought because of negative reviews? This applies to your world as well.

How do I begin?

So, how can you develop a system to help ensure that patients speak well about your practice online and thereby help ensure you maintain a steady stream of new patients?

Here are three simple steps you can take:

1. Act right offline

When a patient has a wonderful experience, they will tell the world about it.

Likewise, when a patient has a bad experience, they will tell the world about it.

The key to having a good reputation online is not giving patients much to complain about, but also giving them plenty to rave about. Offer patients a good experience, and they’ll reward you with a positive reputation and help you build a strong brand.

Ensure you and your staff create a positive patient experience from their appointment’s beginning to its end. Here are five ways you can ensure a good patient experience:

(For more details, check out “The Best Doctors Enhance Their Patient Care With These 3 Tips.”)

1. Acknowledge the patient. Always greet patients with a smile, a hello, and their name when possible. Have a staff member take patients where they’re going, instead of pointing or giving directions.

2. Introduce yourself. A little camaraderie and pleasantry makes a huge difference.

3. Give the patient an estimate. Tell patients how long it will be until the doctor sees them.

4. Explain the procedures. Give patients as much information as you can, as soon as you can, including:

  • What you’re going to do
  • What you’re hoping to learn
  • What outcomes you’re expecting/hoping for
  • What the potential resolutions include

5. Say “thank you.” Always end a patient visit with a fond farewell and an invitation to return.

2. Act right online

Today, what you or your staff say to patients can live forever online, for everyone to see. Prospective and existing patients continually document the good, the bad, and the ugly online.

If you don’t already, begin to scrutinize what you and staff say online. According to Software Advice, 60% of respondents say they feel that it is “very” or “moderately important” that doctors take time to respond to online reviews.

But while it’s important to respond, it’s more important to respond correctly. Never get into arguments with any prospective, current, or former patients online. What you say will live in perpetuity, and you will live to regret it.

Instead, when someone has a complaint online, follow these steps:

  1. Acknowledge their pain.
  2. Apologize that they had this experience. Even if it’s not your fault, show compassion and care.
  3. Explain what you’re going to do differently, or are already doing differently, to prevent this pain in the future.

3. Be proactive

Proactively conduct an online search of your name and your practice’s name weekly.

If you don’t have the ability to do this, then designate someone on your staff to do it for you. You should be checking the following places to keep track of your digital reputation:

  • Search engine results. Use a variety of keywords such as your name or your practice name, or even your last name and the city and state where you live.
  • Local directory listings. Find out which local directories your competitors are listed on that you aren’t by Googling their names. Check out this site for a list of free online directories.
  • Social media. Register profiles for your practice on each social media site that you know your patients use. These include but are not limited to Facebook, Twitter, SnapChat, and Instagram. Monitor your pages and profiles daily or weekly for mentions, comments, and direct messages.
  • Physician rating and review sites. There are a plethora of review sites today, including Yelp, Healthgrades, and ZocDoc, where people can leave reviews about your practice. You should visit these sites on a weekly basis to get a better idea of what patients are saying.

Conclusions

What many doctors fail to realize is that their name and their practice is also a brand. A strong brand creates emotional appeal, and many patients book appointments based more on brand impression than price or outcome data.

Reputation management, when handled appropriately, could potentially increase pipeline flow, decrease obstacles to prospective patient entry, and increase your revenue.

Think of reputation management like planting a tree and then ensuring that it has a strong root structure. It will aid your reputation and root your future revenue.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Use Review Sites and Search Queries to Manage Bad Press

Use Review Sites and Search Queries to Manage Bad Press | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Reputation is critical to every healthcare provider and while many use the internet to promote that reputation, few use the tools it offers to effectively identify and address bad press. Damaging reviews, articles, and blogs can taint a provider’s reputation but they also present an opportunity to respond to the authors to mitigate the damage.

Identifying Bad Press:

The use of online reviews to evaluate or select a physician increased from 25% in 2013 to 42% in 2014. Most of these people used positive reviews to help them select a new physician. Fortunately, the more reviews you have the less impact one negative one will make on your reputation. There are several sites that provide physician reviews but the ones cited as most often used are:

  • Yelp
  • Healthgrades
  • RateMDs
  • Vitals
  • ZocDoc

Yelp and Healthgrades were viewed by consumers as the most trusted of these sites. Your patients should be encouraged to leave reviews on these popular sites but you should periodically monitor them for reviews from unsatisfied patients.

You should also leverage Google and Google Suggest to conduct monthly searches on your company name. These searches will identify articles and blogs that mention your organization and often provide you with an opportunity to respond. Even a “thank you for your feedback” statement will be seen in a positive light by others reading these pieces.

Responding to Bad Press:

Over 80% of online review are either neutral or positive, but what do you do when a review is negative? One of the biggest challenges healthcare providers face is patient privacy restrictions. You cannot speak directly to any treatment aspect of care or otherwise identify the patient or present their personal information such as diagnosis, expected outcomes, etc. Even if the reviewers presents this information themselves, do not repeat it or expand on the information.

Despite these limitations, there are several ways to address bad reviews and negative press.

  • Respond privately if the person has identified him or herself. Apologize for the problem, explain how you will address it, and be sympathetic to the impact it had on the patient. If done well, a critic can become a loyal advocate.
  • Don’t respond to a negative review if you have many positive ones. It is likely that your loyal patients will step in and support you and negate the bad review. This is a more effective response than if you did so yourself.
  • If you feel you must respond, wait until you can address the matter calmly. The impulse to type in a scathing remark is strong, but it can damage your reputation more than the initial review. Give yourself at least 15 minutes before responding.
  • When you choose to respond, stay positive and flip the “script.” Apologize for the problem followed by positive statements such as: “We are sorry that you had a long wait time before seeing the physician. We work hard to keep to our schedule and have added additional staff to help us with this goal.” Do not be defensive, even if the person is unreasonable, i.e. the road was flooded and the doctor was late in arriving to the office.

Monitoring your brand and reputation on the internet is a necessary component of your marketing plan. Remember that bad press is inevitable but your response will determine the extent of its effect on your practice.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.