Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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Why You Should Have a Dress-Code Policy in Your Medical Practice

Why You Should Have a Dress-Code Policy in Your Medical Practice | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

During a meeting this week, I decided it was time to touch on the practice's dress-code policy. This policy should be reviewed about once a year. I had heard from some of the front-office staff members that patients were making potentially inappropriate comments about their clothing, such as, "That shirt looks really nice on you," and "You have great legs, you must work out."

Although these comments may seem harmless to some, they can be the cause for all sorts of disasters (for both staff members and the practice) — especially if management had been approached. It is your responsibility to protect your employees from patients who choose to verbalize thoughts that should be kept to themselves. Having a solid dress-code policy in place is your first line of defense.

If you are not sure where to start, or what to include in your dress-code policy, here are some ideas:

• Employees are expected to dress in an appropriate, professional manner that portrays an image of confidence and security for patients. Cleanliness and neatness are absolutely necessary at all times. Distracting themes in appearance or dress, low-cut clothing, exposed midriff, evening wear, or sheer clothing are unacceptable.

• Clinical staff will wear collared shirts or scrubs, non-denim slacks, and closed-toed, non-sneaker shoes. A nametag will be worn if the name is not embroidered on the company shirt/scrubs.

• Front-office staff should dress in "business casual." They are required to wear nametags or company shirts. As stated above, distracting items in appearance or dress, low-cut clothing, exposed midriff, evening wear, T-shirts, or sheer clothing are unacceptable. Business-like open-toed shoes may be worn, not to include flip-flops or beach sandals.

• (Your practice name) and its directors reserve the right to ask employees who are not dressed in what is deemed a clean and professional manner to change their attire. Failure to comply with the policy will result in being sent home without pay. Further infraction will result in written disciplinary action as decided by the directors.

• Appearance and perception play a key role in patient service. The goal is to be dressed professionally; any employee with body art must ensure that it is covered at all times.

There is a time and place to express staff members' personality, and the workplace should not be that location. If employees follow these types of guidelines and patients still make inappropriate comments, take the offending patient aside, privately, and share your concerns about inappropriate conversation.

It's also important to note that if nine out of 10 employees follow the dress-code policy, and you have one outlier, taking that employee aside and reviewing your policy in a private conversation is much more appropriate than including the entire staff.

The dress-code policy is in place not only to protect your staff, but also to protect your practice. Comments made by patients can be construed by staff as sexual harassment, and contribute to a "threatening work environment." It is up to you to make sure these types of scenarios never happen. In the event they do, have a solid dress-code policy to land back on.


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3 Things Doctors Can Do to Connect With Patients

3 Things Doctors Can Do to Connect With Patients | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Patients have been coming into my office for several years telling me that they looked me up on the Internet and that I have great reviews. I always dismissed these comments, as I knew that these reviews were influenced by many factors and not necessarily accurate. Plus, the reviews were favorable so I gave it little thought. Eventually, I took the opportunity to Google myself and was amused by much of what I read. Patients often made strong statements about me without much evidence. Again, it was largely complimentary so I let things be.

Over time, it dawned on me that virtually every patient was looking me up. I went back to the Internet and tried to picture what I would think if I were a patient looking me up. I realized I was passively being defined, as opposed to actively defining my own image -- and the method of others defining me was often incomplete and arbitrary.

I decided to launch my own website so I could define my online image. I wanted to project what I believe in, and how I practice medicine so that patients who research me can more accurately see if my philosophy truly resonates with theirs.

Of course, it's not so easy. Just putting something out there doesn't assure that it will be what patients find when they search. More importantly, it got me thinking about the doctor/patient relationship. It is clear that patients want to connect with their doctors. Doctors, however, seem more ambivalent about making such a connection. To some doctors, it is as if forming a connection will somehow undermine the traditional relationship which is best kept as formal, paternalistic, and standoffish. We are running our practices the same way they were run 30 years ago. This is a terrible mistake.

I believe I can gain more by giving, learn more by listening, and influence more by connecting.

1. Doctors should focus on connecting with patients.
The world has changed. Most other businesses have changed. Every physician should have his or her own website which patients can easily access. If the physician boldly puts his or her personality and philosophy out there for scrutiny, there will be some who like what they see and some who don't, but the patients who make appointments and ultimately come in to the office will have more productive experiences.

2. Doctors should provide content.
Consumers want content when they do research. Consumers of health care are no different. The best way to advertise is not to yell about how great you are, but simply, to teach. Patients are attracted to content, and particularly, to how the content is presented. You don't have to tell consumers of your value, when you can provide them with content of value.

3. Doctors should embrace social media.
Most doctors pride themselves in getting patients from word-of-mouth. This has always been considered the most desirable method of growing a practice. But word-of-mouth is not as useful as it has been traditionally considered.

Think about researching a restaurant. What is more likely to draw you to a particular restaurant: hearing from several arbitrary people that it is great or not only hearing from these several arbitrary people, but hearing from some specific people who have a track record of making good suggestions about restaurants and also having access to the menu, the restaurant's philosophy on cleanliness and the rigor with which food is selected and procured?

Social media is more than simple word-of-mouth. It enables patients to access meaningful opinions, and then make informed decisions about doctors' practices. Social media gives physicians the opportunity to help empower patients. If a doctor does not embrace this burgeoning technology, his or her prospective patients will end up elsewhere.


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Efficiency of Remote Clinical Documentation Improvement Work

Efficiency of Remote Clinical Documentation Improvement Work | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Would working remotely on clinical documentation improvement (CDI) improve efficiency at a healthcare organization? Some may not think so, but the results from Baystate Health indicate otherwise.

As part of its CDI program, Baystate Health in Springfield, Mass., began teaching CDI specialists to work from home with the help of health IT tools, according to the Journal of AHIMA.2014-10-15-Doc-at-PC

So far, working remotely has led to greater accuracy and efficiency among CDI employees. Several years ago, the organization began expanding its CDI hiring base and moving some staff members off-site.

By 2014, the CDI team rose from four specialists to ten. The original four workers were transitioned to working from home after establishing strong relationships with physicians and coders when working on-site. Both email and EHRs were used to run queries by CDI specialists working from home.

This allows providers to focus on their patients and get back to documentation questions afterward. Essentially, it brings better care to patients by preventing interruptions to workflow.

Often, CDI specialists work on hospital floors and ask physicians or nurses directly about queries, but supervisors explain that little has changed by allowing this work-from-home program. The health information management department has also developed software that allows CDI workers and coders to communicate about cases and records.

Another useful tool that simplifies working remotely is an instant messaging platform the organization incorporated. This system-wide messaging capability allows CDI specialists to pose questions and manage issues with anyone from Baystate Health, whether it is the billing department, the health information management department, or medical and surgery.

“We don’t interrupt the productivity of our individuals by having them pair or mentor off another individual, but we use these tools to understand where the variations lie and where there’s other opportunities,” Jennifer Cavagnac, CCDS, Assistant Director of Clinical Documentation Improvement at Baystate Health, told the news source.

One of the main reasons that the organization introduced working remotely was to improve job satisfaction. Moral in the workplace rose due to increased flexibility. This also led to better retainment of top CDI employees.

Cavagnac goes on to explain that team members who work remotely are encouraged to communicate with the rest of the team and ask questions about cases in order to keep them connected to the workplace. The supervisors attempt to ensure workers don’t feel isolated and that resources are available even when working remotely.

Technology like instant messaging, EHR systems, and telehealth services has not only allowed employees to work remotely but also enabled patients to receive basic healthcare assistance outside of a medical office.

The Federal Times reported that caregivers are able to reach patients on a daily basis through telehealth services but a more integrated system will need to be developed so that patient data can be stored securely and shared in real time.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) began a telehealth network four years ago in order to provide healthcare services in rural areas without a strong hospital system. The medical industry will continue to adapt and improve technologies such as videoconferencing, image storing, and wireless communication in order to strengthen the capabilities of telehealth.

Whether it is to increase work flexibility or improve telehealth services for patients around the nation, technology plays a vital role in connecting individuals across the healthcare spectrum.


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