Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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10 Conversion Boosters for Physician Websites

10 Conversion Boosters for Physician Websites | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Fortunately, optimizing medical practice websites and increasing conversion rates (the number of leads who fill out a contact form or schedule an appointment, for example) can be a relatively simple and straightforward process. Here are 10 conversion boosters to help you transform online leads into filled seats in your waiting room.

1. Content Scan Optimization

On average, website visitors won’t read more than a quarter of the words on a given page, as Neilsen Norman Group explains, so make it easy for them to quickly scan and find the information they need: headlines, navigation buttons, and calls-to-action (CTAs), organized in a clear visual hierarchy.

Other important considerations: headlines should contain keyword search queries (the words they clicked on a Google results page), content should be broken into easily digestible sections, and instructions for next-steps should be extremely clear.

2. Mobile Optimization

Mobile is now, by a clear margin, the primary means for searching the internet, according to Marketing Land — so your website must accommodate mobile users flawlessly. Whether through responsive website design or mobile optimization, content and images should be easy to navigate on a mobile device. Even more importantly, it’s a good idea to add click-to-call (CTC) functionality and track mobile traffic independently.

3. Photo Usage

People like to see other people smiling; statistically, such images have been shown to improve conversion rates by as much as 95%, according to KissMetrics. Professional photos of your staff and patients breed familiarity and trust among leads by demonstrating that you’re a real practice with real, happy patients — while at the same time differentiating you from the competition and leaving a lasting impression.

For practices focusing on cosmetic procedures, “Before” and “After” pictures of patients are also a great way to provide an immediate proof of concept.

4. No Graphic Imagery

Overly medical or graphic content will likely scare potential patients away, and should be avoided. However, showcasing procedures in a palatable manner (often via illustrations) can help to inform, comfort, and draw in your prospects.

5. Video Usage

Videos are a highly effective way to engage leads and deliver information concisely. In fact, consumers at large are 1.81x more likely to make a purchase after watching a video, as Adobe explains. Such content should feature physicians, staff, or patient testimonials and, of course, be formatted for mobile. Make sure to avoid annoying auto-play functions.

6. Testimonials & Reviews

Given that 88% of consumers trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations, according to Search Engine Land — and that 62% of patients seek reviews as the first step in finding a doctor — sites should always feature patient testimonials prominently. In fact, positive reviews have been proven to deliver sales boosts of up to 18%, as Econsultancy reports.

7. Easy-to-Find Phone Number

It’s much easier for patients to call you directly than to fill out a submission form your website. Accurate and up-to-date contact numbers must be placed visibly in an upper-right corner or on your “Contact Us” page. A frequent but easily avoidable misstep: never save your contact number as a text file, which can’t be copied and pasted.

8. Contact Forms: Intuitiveness

Physicians require patient contact information for follow-up, but website visitors aren’t always willing to provide it. Forms need be placed in obvious locations throughout the site, and the form-filling process must be seamless — any minor pain point can be cause for hesitancy.

9. Contact Forms: Simplicity

For customer convenience, aim to collect only the information from leads that is absolutely essential. It’s often helpful to have only a few required fields, with the rest being optional. But take note: one company managed to increase conversions 120% by simply reducing their number of required fields from 11 to 4, according to Ubounce. And don’t forget: form-filling on mobile should be optimized for the platform — in other words, keep it simple.

10. Contact Forms: Reinforce Trust

Filling out a contact form is, essentially, like lending your personal information to a complete stranger. Build customer trust with highly visible accreditation logos, trust seals, and certifications from well known, reputable organizations.

While these 10 conversion boosters can help to significantly improve your physician website, performance evaluation and optimization should be ongoing processes — testing, experimentation, re-testing, and implementation are the keys to long-term success.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Should We Use Social Media to Diagnose Diseases?

Should We Use Social Media to Diagnose Diseases? | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Last month, I wrote an article called “3 Amazing Ways Google Search Data is Improving Healthcare,” that discussed the notion of using search engine data to diagnose illness before patients are even aware that they might be sick.

 

I recently came across a Wired article by Dr. Sam Volchenboum, the Director of the Center for Research Informatics at the University of Chicago, and a co-founder of Litmus Health, a data science provider for early-stage clinical trials, that explored this idea in depth. Here are a few of the key takeaways from his piece.

Data, Data Everywhere

From a data science perspective, says Dr. Volchenboum, the world is effectively becoming “one big clinical trial.” Internet search, social media, mobile devices, wearables, etc. are generating a steady — and staggeringly large — stream of information that “can provide insights into a person’s health and well-being.”

We’re not quite there yet, but it’s entirely possible that in the very near future, platforms like Facebook and Google will be able to alert someone to the possible presence of a disease before they’re even aware of it. While, in theory, this kind of technology would have the potential to save lives, Dr. Volchenboum aptly points out that when it comes to electronic patient health data, it’s never black and white.

How Does it Work?

In order to create a predictive model, a platform like Facebook would have to start by working backwards. Dr. Volchenboum explains, it would generate “a data set consisting of social media posts from tens of thousands of people will likely chronicle the journey that some had on their way to a diagnosis of cancer, depression, or inflammatory bowel disease.”

Then, using machine-learning technologies, a researcher or provider could analyze all of those disparate data points, taking into account the “language, style, and content of those posts both before and after the diagnosis.” This would allow them to create models capable of identifying similar behavior, which, in theory, would suggest a similar outcome down the road.

While such “early warning systems” are not yet in place, the underlying technology necessary to develop them certainly exists — the advanced predictive and machine-learning algorithms powering Facebook and Google’s advertising platforms basically use the same concept, but simply employ them to different ends.

A Double-Edged Sword?

I agree with Dr. Volchenboum that yes, we should start leveraging the vast amounts of consumer data in ways that benefit society as a whole, but that we also need to be very careful if and when we attempt to do so.

As we all know, the companies behind today’s biggest digital platforms detail how they plan to use consumer data in their terms of service; but as we also all know, few people actually take the time to read the terms of service. So, while these companies may be covered from a legal perspective, they’re not actually providing a functional window for patients who may be concerned about where their data ends up.

If this is the path we ultimately go down (and I’m quite sure it will be), we need to make sure it’s a highly transparent, opt-in system for those patients interested in participating. That means spelling it all out in terms that patients can actually understand, ensuring their data remains protected, and, if they choose not to participate, respecting that decision and keeping their data private. As patients continue to take a more active role in their health and treatment decisions, it’s likely that many would be in favor of this kind of technology — we just need to make sure it’s built upon a foundation of trust and respect.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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