Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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Online ratings and reviews why they matter for doctors 

Online ratings and reviews why they matter for doctors  | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

You listen to your patients in the office, but what about after they leave? Do you know what your patients say about you online? 

 

Consider the following situation and what you might do differently. 

 

A prospective patient, let’s call her Karen, has a nagging shoulder pain that keeps her up at night. She tosses and turns in her sleep, wondering what her doctor would say about the pain. Finally, after 3 weeks of sleepless nights, Karen goes her to primary physician to discuss her shoulder. Her primary doctor refers Karen to an orthopedic specialist. The doctor writes down a few names to call and sends her on her way. “Good luck!” he says. 

 

Karen immediately goes online to research the doctors referred by her primary physician. She types a name into Google. “Mark Anthony, MD,” let’s say. Within seconds, Karen sees where Dr. Anthony is located, his phone number, and a link to his website. As she searches a little more, Google also finds several reviews written about Dr. Anthony. 

 

Let’s stop here for a minute. Now, if you are Dr. Anthony, you might not even know these reviews exist. They are not on your website, they are Google. And, if Karen reads a bad review, chances are you won’t be the one to fix her shoulder. Is there a way to monitor your online reputation, you ask? You bet. 

Prospective patients google doctor names all the time and look for reviews. Gone are the days of simply taking your doctor’s referral without doing some checking first. No one is using an old-fashioned phone book either. Clearly, your online reputation can have an impact on your practice. 

 

So, how can you be sure that when someone googles you they don’t find incorrect or outdated information, or worse, a bad review?  

 

As a leader in medical website design, iHealthSpot can include a special feature on your website that gives you a bird’s eye view of your online presence. This tool is packed with everything you need to know what your customers say, generate positive reviews, manage negative reviews, and more. All in real time. 

Managing your online ratings and patient reviews also send a message to patients that tell them you are listening. You hear what they say and appreciate their valuable feedback.

With your online reputation in check, prospective patients like Karen will have confidence in your business, and they are more likely to book an appointment (and post a positive review afterward!).

 

Try googling yourself and your practice. If you don’t like what you find, your next call should be iHealthSpot for online reputation management help. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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How Does Your Medical Organization Handle Negative Feedback?

How Does Your Medical Organization Handle Negative Feedback? | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Ping! An email comes in. You open it and your face drops. One of your patients just posted a negative review on your Facebook page. What do you do next?

Your instinct may be to ignore or delete the review, but I assure you this is not the answer. Trying to silence negative reviews misses a valuable opportunity for us to connect with patients. It sends the message that you are more interested in covering up negative feedback than addressing it and improving your practice.

Many of us in healthcare need to shift our perspective on public patient feedback. Social media marketing is about more than pushing out content. Social media platforms provide an opportunity for us to talk — and listen — to customers. So when we do get feedback, it means these platforms are working well. Negative feedback is not a threat to business or a personal attack; it is an opportunity to show your patients (and potential patients) not only that you listen, but that you are eager to improve their experience.

Below are five tips to effectively manage online reviews:

1. Be Prompt

When a negative review appears, respond in a timely fashion. Creating a policy for responding to online reviews now will help you be prepared to handle the majority of reviews. Pull together important phone numbers and email addresses, and even write sample responses to common questions or complaints.

2. Be Gracious

Resist the urge to get defensive. Instead, address the reviewer’s concerns with professionalism and kindness. Post a public response thanking them for taking the time to share their experience, and apologize that their experience did not meet your standard of care. Your public response shows other members of that online platform that you care about feedback and that you are responsive to concerns expressed by your patients or their family members. Ultimately, that helps to deepen people’s connections with your brand.

3. Move the Conversation Offline

Once you have demonstrated your dedication to making the situation right, it’s best to move the conversation offline as soon as possible. Encourage the patient to contact the office so you can hear more about their experience and learn from it.

4. Differentiating Between Trolls and Concerned Customers

Unfortunately, there are some people who are determined to shock and upset others. It can be difficult to discern between trolls and upset customers. Pay attention to their motivation and tone. If the person is using explicit or inflammatory language, there’s a good chance you are dealing with a troll. No response will satisfy them — instead, they will use a response as an invitation to keep posting.

Trolls want attention. No matter how difficult it might be, ignoring a troll could be your best tactic to get them to leave you alone. If someone uses profanity or harasses other users, consider deleting their comment(s) and blocking the account.

5. Ask For Reviews

The best way to prepare for a negative review is to actively encourage patients who have had positive experiences to post on various social media platforms and review sites. You might even print out instructions explaining how to do so. That way, any negative comments, though valuable, will seem inconsequential compared to the dozens of positive reviews.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Dealing with Negative Online Reviews of Doctors

Dealing with Negative Online Reviews of Doctors | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Can one bad apple ruin it for the bunch? Yes, if you’re talking about online reviews.

Doctors train for many years and work very hard to maintain robust practices, so it is only natural that they are very protective about their reputations. As sites such as healthgrades.com and ratemds.com grow in popularity, it becomes harder and harder for physicians to manage their reputations online.

 

So what happens when a patient posts a scathingly bad review?

The results may not be as bad as you would imagine. In fact, a study found that most patients had never checked their doctor’s reputation online at all. However, the same study found that patients are beginning to be more aware of physician reviews online and are likely to begin consulting online reviews of doctors in the future.

That means that a bad review may not be the end of the world right now, but could negatively impact a physician’s future business if he or she does not take steps to improve his or her image online.

 

Combating a Bad Review

The best way to combat a bad review is to fight fire with fire. While many doctors may feel the urge to discourage patients for posting reviews online, the exact opposite is the best response. Doctors should work with their marketing team to make a plan to encourage patients to post more reviews online.

Why? Because a recent analysis of online doctor ratings shows that more than three-quarters of all doctor reviews are overwhelmingly positive. Encouraging patients to go online and write a review is very likely to result in a higher number of positive reviews, which will help to mitigate the damage of any negative reviews.

When criticized in a public forum, it may be tempting for a doctor to respond publicly. In most circumstances, the doctor would be better served to either respond privately or not at all. Often the doctor’s other patients will publicly defend their doctor. If there is truth to the criticism, however, the physician should take steps to remedy any problems that led to the negative review.

 

What if a Negative Review Isn’t True?

Physicians should directly contact review sites if they believe a review is planted or false. While review sites will not remove reviews solely on the basis of their being negative, some will consider removing a review if it can be proven false or inaccurate. Most sites will require some kind of proof.

Lawsuits are rarely a good option for physicians seeking to vindicate themselves from a negative review, even if it is false. A lawsuit can draw more attention to a situation that will most likely go away on its own, and can negatively impact a physician’s relationship with his or her other patients. If the physician has proof that the negative review was planted by a competitor, a lawsuit may be appropriate and more successful than one against a patient. Doctors may be better served, however, by engaging patients and encouraging them to participate in the online community.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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