Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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How Online Reputation Management Helps Your Practice Growth 

How Online Reputation Management Helps Your Practice Growth  | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The first month of a new year is all about creating new strategies for your practice in 2018. From an informative website to strengthening your presence on a social media platform that allows your target audience search you on Google or other search engines. In addition to SEO, it’s the practice reviews that are floating everywhere on the Google and establishing your online reputation. Today, in the world of the Internet, your practice’s growth is at the stake of your online reputation, so you need to get your practice displayed in the most pristine way.

 

Online reputation acts as the decision-influencer of a patient’s journey. 90% people say their decisions were influenced by the positive reviews. The Internet world affects purchase decisions of around 85% of consumers.

 

Online reputation management might seem to be a daunting task because of the numerous review sites and the active, positive or negative response of patients on your practice. And you just can’t ignore them. Let’s check the benefits of strong online reputation.

Building trust

Since online reputation is considered as a personal recommendation by many, it results in building the higher trust of patients in your practice. The number of positive reviews you have is directly proportional to the number of followers you get on your practice. Irrespective of the size of your practice, people want to know about your services before making a physical visit to your clinic. People wholeheartedly trust positive reviews.

Growing profitability

Profitability and trust go hand-in-hand. When a patient, searches online for a treatment offered by your practice and comes across your competitor who ranks higher on various review sites, then you are likely to lose them. So, aim to get a number of positive reviews on all review platforms. People read not more than 10 reviews before visiting a practice.

To maintain the reputation of your practice you are required to deal with conflicts, i.e. responding to negative reviews. Replying to negative feedback should be in real-time to show your concern for your patients but with a calm mind. This act is admired by reviewers and can convert the disappointed patients into happy ones. For effective relationship building, you should learn how to respond to negative feedbacks. This builds your online reputation. The leads and revenue of your practice are directly impacted by the way people perceive your practice.

Some other direct and indirect benefits of online reputation management

– Strong reputation creates a great impression of your practice for existing and new patients. This way you can identify the key touch points for your patients and build sustainable relationships.

– With effective online reputation management strategy, you can showcase the services offered by your practice and how you are better than your competitors.

– You can even win over your cold visitors and turn them into your patients with your good online reputation that will grow their trust in your services.

– With the help of good online reputation, you can display your thought leader personality to the world and influence them. This is an effective way to leverage your image over the competitors and grow your practice exponentially as you end up having free media coverage.

Technical Dr. Inc.s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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3 Things Doctors Can Do to Connect With Patients

3 Things Doctors Can Do to Connect With Patients | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Patients have been coming into my office for several years telling me that they looked me up on the Internet and that I have great reviews. I always dismissed these comments, as I knew that these reviews were influenced by many factors and not necessarily accurate. Plus, the reviews were favorable so I gave it little thought. Eventually, I took the opportunity to Google myself and was amused by much of what I read. Patients often made strong statements about me without much evidence. Again, it was largely complimentary so I let things be.

Over time, it dawned on me that virtually every patient was looking me up. I went back to the Internet and tried to picture what I would think if I were a patient looking me up. I realized I was passively being defined, as opposed to actively defining my own image -- and the method of others defining me was often incomplete and arbitrary.

I decided to launch my own website so I could define my online image. I wanted to project what I believe in, and how I practice medicine so that patients who research me can more accurately see if my philosophy truly resonates with theirs.

Of course, it's not so easy. Just putting something out there doesn't assure that it will be what patients find when they search. More importantly, it got me thinking about the doctor/patient relationship. It is clear that patients want to connect with their doctors. Doctors, however, seem more ambivalent about making such a connection. To some doctors, it is as if forming a connection will somehow undermine the traditional relationship which is best kept as formal, paternalistic, and standoffish. We are running our practices the same way they were run 30 years ago. This is a terrible mistake.

I believe I can gain more by giving, learn more by listening, and influence more by connecting.

1. Doctors should focus on connecting with patients.
The world has changed. Most other businesses have changed. Every physician should have his or her own website which patients can easily access. If the physician boldly puts his or her personality and philosophy out there for scrutiny, there will be some who like what they see and some who don't, but the patients who make appointments and ultimately come in to the office will have more productive experiences.

2. Doctors should provide content.
Consumers want content when they do research. Consumers of health care are no different. The best way to advertise is not to yell about how great you are, but simply, to teach. Patients are attracted to content, and particularly, to how the content is presented. You don't have to tell consumers of your value, when you can provide them with content of value.

3. Doctors should embrace social media.
Most doctors pride themselves in getting patients from word-of-mouth. This has always been considered the most desirable method of growing a practice. But word-of-mouth is not as useful as it has been traditionally considered.

Think about researching a restaurant. What is more likely to draw you to a particular restaurant: hearing from several arbitrary people that it is great or not only hearing from these several arbitrary people, but hearing from some specific people who have a track record of making good suggestions about restaurants and also having access to the menu, the restaurant's philosophy on cleanliness and the rigor with which food is selected and procured?

Social media is more than simple word-of-mouth. It enables patients to access meaningful opinions, and then make informed decisions about doctors' practices. Social media gives physicians the opportunity to help empower patients. If a doctor does not embrace this burgeoning technology, his or her prospective patients will end up elsewhere.


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