Online Reputation Management for Doctors
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Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
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5 Challenges for Advertising Healthcare on Google

5 Challenges for Advertising Healthcare on Google | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

With 3.5 billion Google searches made every day, there’s no question that businesses need some sort of presence on the world’s most popular search engine to succeed online.

 

And the most efficient way to ensure you have a presence on the search engines is with paid advertising. Advertising healthcare on Google, however, comes with its own set of challenges.

1. You cannot promote certain services and products

The first challenge for healthcare marketers is that certain products and services cannot be advertised at all. For example, Google does not allow advertisements for CBD oil.

 

In some cases, products and services will only reach a limited audience, rather than an ad getting banned altogether. And you can only advertise certain products and services—including pharmaceuticals and addiction treatment centers—in select countries with a special certification from Google.

2. Can’t use certain phrasing

Aside from the products and services you cannot promote, healthcare marketers also must avoid certain phrasing in Google Ads. These phrasing concerns apply to both the ad copy—what appears in the Google search results—and the landing page copy—where people land when they click on the ad.

 

In some cases, Google rejects or takes down advertisements it deems to be against their policies, all of which are outlined here.

 

For example, a low-testosterone clinic would have to be very careful phrasing their advertisements, as Google may consider an ad or associated landing page to be banned adult content. 

3. Must use certain phrasing

Healthcare advertisers must also include certain types of phrasing in advertisements. You cannot guarantee specific results from a product or from your services. On a landing page, when displaying testimonials or before-and-after pictures, it’s important to use phrasing such as “Results vary and are not guaranteed.”

 

Another thing to include on any landing page is ad copy that actually matches or lines up with the landing page copy. Google’s sophisticated algorithms can quickly detect that an ad for vein services leads to a landing page without any information about veins whatsoever. 

4. No retargeting

Google does not allow healthcare marketers to retarget prospective patients with advertising.

 

This means that, if someone visits your website or clicks on your ad, hospitals and practices cannot use display advertising (ads that appear on other sites) to lure that person back in—all due to potential patient privacy concerns. (However, there are other ways to 

That’s why it’s so important to design a landing page for conversions, so that people who click on your ad have an easy way to fill out a form (or call) and express interest in your services. 

5. Competition

When our agency first got started over a decade ago, digital marketing for healthcare was a fairly niche expertise. Today, we are still leaders in our area—but the competition has gotten tough.

 

When you’re advertising on Google Ads, you’ll have to bid strategically, take advantage of negative keywords (the keywords you DON’T want to rank for), and use advertising best practices to get potential patients to visit your landing page and convert. 

Work with a Google Premier Partner

When you work with a Google Premier Partner for your campaigns, you’re partnering with experts who don’t just employ a “set-it-and-forget-it” mentality with your Google Ads. They’ll constantly optimize to get you ahead of the competition and help your landing pages convert. 

 

Better yet, partner with Healthcare Success to work with a healthcare digital advertising agency that knows the challenges specific to healthcare. Call 800-656-0907 for more information.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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www.technicaldr.com

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8 Essential Features for Testimonial Software

8 Essential Features for Testimonial Software | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The right testimonial software can help you gather more online testimonials, and improve your business’s reputation without demanding hours of your time. To help you save time and manage your reviews, there are a few essential features that your testimonial software should have. Your software should help you not only display testimonials in an attractive way, but also gather and manage testimonials efficiently.

8 Essential Features for Testimonial Software

1. Automate Testimonial Gathering

Many types of testimonial software allow you to display testimonials, but few actually help you gather them. This is an essential feature for testimonial software that can help you automate your testimonial collection process and save hours of time. To use your testimonial software to effectively gather testimonials and automate the process, you’ll need to have your testimonial management, display and submission process all connected in one application.

2. Gather Testimonials with Landing Page

To start gathering testimonials, you first need a place for customers to submit them. The ideal testimonial software will allow you to easily add a testimonial submission landing page to your website. This should give customers everything they need to submit a testimonial directly to your platform. For example, Uni Key Health Systems used their testimonial landing page to incentivize customers and give them an easy place to submit their thoughts.

3. Usable With Your Website

Almost a third of the web now operates on WordPress, and new site owners are migrating to WordPress every day, making usability with WordPress a high priority. You don’t necessarily need a WordPress plugin to manage your testimonials, but the testimonial software that you use should be compatible without a lot of coding experience.

4. Compatible with Multiple Formats

Text testimonials are easy to fake, and customers recognize this. Your testimonial software should, at minimum, be compatible with pictures, so prospective customers can see that the testimonials are real and trustworthy. As video gains popularity and generates more shares, it’s helpful to use testimonial software that is compatible with video, or you might find yourself falling behind.

5. Approve and Dismiss Testimonials

Inevitably, you’ll receive some testimonials that you would rather not post on your site. While you can’t always control what customers say on other platforms, you can control the testimonials that you display on your own site. This means you’ll need a way to review, approve and dismiss testimonials accordingly. Make sure that your testimonial software has a place to store testimonials, whether text or video, until you review them and decide what to do.

6. Add Account Managers

You’re busy running your business, and you might not have time to review all the testimonials you receive. In this case, it’s helpful to be able to add others to your testimonial software as account managers, without sharing your own login credentials.

7. Match Site Formatting

A variety of testimonial apps allow you to display testimonials in different ways. Before you choose an app, make sure you can display testimonials the way that suits your site design. Keep in mind that your site or the way you use testimonials might change, so it’s good to have some flexibility here. Choose testimonial software that allows you to easily display testimonials on your website, and in multiple places across your site. Look for the ability to change the number of testimonials displayed, change the length or size displayed, and change colors or text as needed.

8. Share to Social Media

Customers put more confidence in products that others are raving about. This is the basic psychology of social proof, and part of the reason testimonials are such powerful selling and marketing tools. The wider reach your testimonials have, the more impactful they will be. Choose testimonial software that allows you to integrate with social media platforms, and spread your social proof far and wide.

You might not need all of these features now, but it’s easier to grow into available features than to move all of your testimonials to new software later. When your testimonial software has the features you need, you can keep it for years to come. Before you choose, give your testimonial software a test drive to see if it has the features that you’re looking for.

 
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12 Signs It's Time to Request a Client Testimonial

12 Signs It's Time to Request a Client Testimonial | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Developing a collection of outstanding client testimonials means not only delivering a great experience but also knowing how and when to ask your client for their thoughts. If you ask too soon, they might not be ready, but if you delay too long it might be too late. Look for one or more of these 12 signs it’s time to request a client testimonial and you’ll know when to get your testimonial request emails, phone call or face-to-face meeting ready.

 

12 Signs It’s Time to Request a Client Testimonial

1. The Praise Email

If you consistently impress your clients, you’ve no doubt received more than one email full of praise. Your client has already gone out of their way to tell you what a great job you’ve done. This is the perfect time to ask for a customer testimonial. Make it easy for your client to submit a testimonial online and you can turn your high praise email into an official client testimonial.

2. A Stellar Meeting

When you meet with your client, sometimes everything just goes smoothly. Maybe you’ve delivered great news or you’ve reached a milestone together. For whatever reason, you know your client will leave your office feeling satisfied. This is a good time to ask for a client testimonial. Have question prompts and a way to record their testimonial ready, so you can get their information right away.

3. Tremendous Results

Some clients experience results that are even better than expected. When you deliver these results to your client, or when they see them for the first time, they’ll be likely to give a client testimonial. Explain the impact of the results if it’s not clear and give your client a moment to enjoy them before asking. Keep in mind that lawful testimonials must give an accurate representation of expected results; you may need to mention that this client’s results, though possible, aren’t typical.

4. Other Reviews

It’s good practice to audit your business reputation online and see what customers are saying. This might be a business review site like Yelp or an industry-specific review site like lawyers.com. As you regularly check in, you may notice previous clients that have talked about your good work unsolicited. If you recognize the name on the review, contact them again to thank them and ask for a client testimonial you can use for your website or marketing materials. If you don’t recognize the name, look at the date the review was posted and see what clients you served near that time.

5. Problem Solved

It doesn’t always take tremendous results to make a big impact; you just need to make a big impact on that client’s life. If your product or service solved a problem your client had, ask them to explain their experience in a client testimonial. Remember, your solution doesn’t have to be earth-shattering to be impactful; you may have simply saved them time, given them confidence, or explained a system they didn’t understand.

6. Parting Ways

Ideally, you would like happy clients to return to your business or maintain an ongoing business relationship, but this isn’t always possible. In many cases, your job has a beginning and an end. Your client may also be relocating out of the area, or their needs have changed. If your business partnership is near its end, ask your loyal customer to mark the occasion with a client testimonial.

7. Contract Renewal

In some industries, clients may work with their preferred businesses for years. If they renew their contract with you or make another long-term commitment, they clearly enjoy working with you. As you thank them for renewing and outline the plan for another fantastic year, ask if they would answer a few questions about your work so far and give a client testimonial.

8. Plan Upgrade

If you offer tiers of service and a customer decides to upgrade, their needs may have changed, they may have new confidence in your business or both. Take this opportunity to reconnect with your client; thank them for their business, explain the new capabilities of their service, and ask for a client testimonial.

9. Recommendation

The goal of testimonials is to show the quality of work you do and inspire confidence and trust through social proof. If a client’s friend, family member, or business associate contacts you, your client has already made an informal testimonial. When you thank them for their recommendation, ask if they will repeat what they said to their associate in an official client testimonial.

10. Positive Customer Survey

Conducting regular surveys on customer happiness is a good way to make sure your business relationships are strong and your own performance is on track. When customers fill out a positive survey, send a response with a client testimonial request. You can even automate this process with email triggers and a testimonial gathering landing page to save time.

11. Implementing Changes

Whether you make a small change to your terms of service, you add new services to your office, or you completely revamp your business model, it’s essential to keep your customers in the loop. Hopefully, the changes you’ve made are informed by the feedback you previously received. Once your clients have had a chance to use and adapt to the new changes, ask them how they feel. Reply to the positive sentiment with a client testimonial request.

12. After an Event

If you see your client at a tradeshow, convention, or another industry event, ask them how business is going. This extra familiarity can go a long ways towards gathering testimonials. During or after the event, follow up and ask them to submit a client testimonial.

If you’ve noticed any of these signs, it’s time to ask for a client testimonial! Asking for testimonials can be difficult at first, but it helps to have a system in place and to know when the timing is right. Make it easy to submit testimonials, continue to deliver a terrific experience and you’ll quickly develop a list of client testimonials.

 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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How Doctors Should Respond To Negative Online Reviews

How Doctors Should Respond To Negative Online Reviews | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Most businesses have mixed emotions about online consumer reviews, but the doctor community has opposed consumer reviews of their services to an unusual degree.  Why?  Some possible explanations:

Doctors are sensitive about their reputation.  Small business owners (including doctors) have strong linkages between their personal identity and the business’ identity, but doctors often take negative patient reviews even more personally than most business owners.  Sometimes, this reflects the doctor’s passion for delivering high-quality services, so doctors are frustrated if they don’t achieve that goal.  Other times, doctors may feel like the patients weren’t grateful, especially when the doctor did the best he/she could in complex circumstances.

 

Patient reviews matter.  Historically, patient opinions about the quality of their healthcare didn’t matter too much.  Many doctors got patients through hospital/insurance affiliations and referrals from other doctors.  Patient word-of-mouth also played a role, but doctors who failed to keep patients happy didn’t always suffer the professional consequences.  Now, because patients can speak publicly about their experiences and influence other prospective patients, they have new-found leverage over doctors.

 

Patients can’t judge the quality of medical advice.  Doctors often complain that patients lack the medical expertise to evaluate whether the doctor gave sound medical advice.  While doctors are the “experts” in the doctor-patient relationship, this usually overstates matters by a lot.  Patients are more sophisticated about medical services than ever before (due, in part, to their independent Internet research), and patients often can and do obtain second opinions from other doctors.  Furthermore, as I’ll discuss in a moment, patient reviews often address matters unrelated to a doctor’s medical advice, and in those cases the patients' lack of medical expertise is irrelevant.

 

Confidentiality obligations restrict doctors’ ability to respond.  Unlike many other small business owners, doctors owe their patients a duty of confidentiality.  As a result, doctors feel like patients can criticize their medical advice but the doctor can’t respond adequately due to confidentiality obligations.

Preying on these fears, for years an outfit called Medical Justice helped doctors suppress reviews by their patients.  Medical Justice provided form contracts that asked patients to sign away their right to review the doctor or transfer the copyright in any unwritten reviews to the doctor.  Many doctors--I estimate about 1,200 at the peak--embraced Medical Justice’s attractively pitched “solution” to the purported problems associated with patient reviews.

 

Encourage, Don’t Discourage, Patient Reviews

Everyone--even Medical Justice--now realizes it was a huge mistake to discourage patient reviews.  Doctors should want and encourage their patients to write reviews because:

 

Most online reviews by patients are positive.  The vast majority of patients’ reviews of their doctors are positive.  Doctors should get the public accolades for the excellent work they do.

Reviews provide doctors with useful feedback.  In addition to (rare) concerns about medical advice, patients may encounter issues with parking, office managers, billing practices, operating hours or bedside manners.  Indeed, most patient reviews address issues other than medical advice (see this press release).  While none of these detract from the quality of a doctor's medical advice, these issues do matter to existing and prospective patients.  Patient reviews provide doctors with honest and incredibly valuable feedback about what they are doing right with their practice, and what aspects they might want to revisit.

 

Individual reviews may not be credible, but the wisdom of the crowd is credible.  Doctors are sometimes petrified that a single patient will post an unfair review online, and that review will permanently damage the doctor’s practice.  Although this fear is easily overblown (prospective patients typically don’t make such an important decision based on a single review), it is quite easy to avoid this issue.  As the First Amendment maxim goes, the solution to “bad” speech is more speech.  Consistent with the “wisdom of the crowds,” any individual review isn’t necessarily credible, but the aggregate assessment of all patients becomes increasingly credible as the number of reviews grows.  If a doctor's only online review is negative, that review gains power from its uniqueness.  By expanding the number of online reviews, prospective patients get a more complete picture.

 

This reinforces why Medical Justice’s so-called solution was so counterproductive.  Doctors need a large enough set of patient reviews to achieve the wisdom of the crowds, yet Medical Justice helped and encouraged doctors to suppress patient reviews--increasing the odds that doctors would have only one or two patient reviews online, giving those reviews heightened significance for prospective patients who were starved for that information.  Doctors who followed Medical Justice's system are now scrambling to grow their review numbers; those who never tried to suppress patient reviews have a decided advantage over them.

 

It is unethical, and perhaps illegal, to restrict patient reviews.  Medical Justice’s contracts have not been definitively tested in court yet, so we don’t know for sure if they’re legal or not.  However, efforts to restrict patient reviews face some serious problems, such as:

  • In the late 1990s, software company Network Associates tried to impose a contractual clause restricting buyers from publishing reviews of the software.  In 2003, a New York court enjoined Network Associates from continuing to use that clause.
  • The U.S. Department of Health & Human Service’s Office of Civil Rights required a doctor to stop using Medical Justice’s anti-review form.
  • In one case where a doctor threatened to enforce the Medical Justice form against a patient, the patient instead preemptively sued the doctor.  The court’s initial opinion signaled serious skepticism about the legitimacy of the doctor’s conduct.

Even more importantly than the legal risks, asking patients to restrict their rights sends a terrible message to a doctor's patients.  Basically, it tells patients that the doctor doesn’t trust them enough to tell the truth online.  That distrust, at the beginning of an often long-term and vital relationship, permanently undermines the doctor-patient relationship.  How can a doctor expect patients to talk honestly and openly about their personal medical conditions, if the doctor has told them from day 1 that he/she don’t trust them to be honest elsewhere?

 

Dealing with a Negative Review

If the number of patient reviews is large enough, any outlier negative review will be diluted by the others.  Still, some things a doctor might do in response to a negative review:

Learn from the review.  Negative reviews offer doctors valuable feedback (no matter how poorly expressed), including feedback that patients are too afraid to tell their doctors directly.  Doctors should try to overcome their emotional reactions to a negative review and think objectively whether the patient might have a point--and if so, how the doctor will improve his/her services.

Respond privately.  If a doctor runs into an incredibly unhappy patient, it is worth trying to reach out to the patient privately.  (Not all patient reviews are attributed, so this isn’t always possible).  Doctors should show sincerity, sympathy and contrition.  When done properly, doctors frequently can turn their worst critic into their most loyal ally.

 

Respond publicly only if necessary. Repeatedly, I’ve seen a doctor’s happy patients rush to the defense of a doctor under attack and independently rebut a negative review.  If a doctor's patients are satisfied, the doctor can trust them to correct misinformation.

Where a review criticizes a doctor's medical advice, the doctor can’t respond with specifics about the patient’s circumstances (unless the patient consents), but the doctor can describe his/her standard protocols under specified conditions.

 

If the negative feedback is accurate, the doctor might apologize in public and explain how he or she will going to avoid the problem in the future.  Patients don’t expect doctors to be perfect, but they do expect doctors to learn from their mistakes.  Owning up to a mistake helps prospective patients trust their doctors even more. Note that responding to the review at all could provide extra visibility to the review, so public silence might be a rational choice.

Complain to review websites about fake reviews.  Review websites often won’t intervene when doctors claim that reviews defame them, and they are not legally obligated to do so (or legally liable for their failure to intervene) due to a statute Congress enacted in 1996 (47 USC 230).  However, if a doctor has credible evidence that the review is fake, review websites may be interested.  Review websites hate fake reviews as much as doctors do.

 

Lawsuits are almost never a good option.  Suing patients is a categorically bad idea, even if they’ve lied.  Inevitably the patient will respond with a malpractice claim or will bring a complaint against the doctor's license to practice; a lawsuit calls more attention to the patient’s assertions (the Streisand Effect); doctors suing patients often look like they have something to hide; and perhaps most importantly, the doctor isn't likely to win.  Over the past decade, I’ve identifiedabout two dozen doctor vs. patient lawsuits over online reviews.  Doctors rarely win in court, and even worse, some doctors ultimately must pay the attorneys’ fees of their patients as well as their own.  That’s a really bad business outcome.

 

The legal analysis is more complicated if the doctor can prove that a competitor or vindictive party is posting fake reviews.  Those lawsuits are more winnable than lawsuits against patients, but often the time and costs required to win simply aren’t worth it.  If a doctor decides to go this route, the doctor should clarify with his/her attorney what the ideal outcome is, the odds of achieving that ideal outcome, and how much it will cost to try.

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Does SEO Really Matter for Healthcare?

Does SEO Really Matter for Healthcare? | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

It’s a buzzword you hear any time you talk to someone about visibility for your business’s website. Have you thought about your SEO? 

SEO stands for search engine optimization, and it’s a practice that’s changed drastically over the years. But the purpose remains the same: the term describes the art and science of getting your website to rank towards the top of Google’s search results (or any search engine). 

 

Still, healthcare practices have many ways of advertising their services. That’s why you may be wondering: is SEO truly vital for a healthcare organization?

EO for Healthcare: Why It Matters

The one statistic you need to know about why you should care about SEO for healthcare:

75% of people won’t click past the first page of the search results(Hubspot)

And when it comes to searches on just a mobile device, that number jumps up even higher. People on mobile devices often don’t scroll past the first few results. 

 

Your chances of being seen online drop dramatically when you fall even below the top 3 results for the terms you hope to rank for. And if you’re on page 2, 3, or 4—forget about patients finding your website organically online.

What Types of Healthcare Organizations Should Worry about SEO?

Any healthcare organization can benefit from optimizing their website for the search engines. Patients will research your business online. In fact, the internet is the primary way patients find their doctors today—about 68% of your patients start by checking the search engines.

 

Visibility at the top of the search engines is of vital importance to primary care doctors and urgent care. When patients are in need, they’re likely to search something like “urgent care in Los Angeles” and choose a close, well-reviewed location. 

 

Think specialty practices are exempt? Patients will research a referral online before scheduling an appointment. Depending on their insurance, some may choose their own specialty practice they’ve researched online in lieu of a physician’s referral.

Healthcare SEO May Be More Complicated Than You Think

Healthcare SEO means more than simply including every keyword you may want to rank for on your website. You have to make keywords read naturally, as Google counts readability as an SEO factor. You also have to take steps like optimizing the code on your site and generating quality backlinks pointing to your website to build your credibility in search.

 

Besides, you have to spend time thinking about which keywords are more likely to draw visitors to your website. Think about the user intent of someone landing on your website.

 

If they’re looking for a doctor who might treat a problem they’ve been having, would they search something like “knee replacement surgery,” or would they look for info about “knee injuries?” It’s tough to say until you do the research.

 

Optimizing your website for search engines is not something you can do in a day. It takes quite a bit of time. In fact…

SEO May Not Be the Fastest Way to Rank

Search engine optimization is a slow process. Google won’t simply see the changes you’ve made to your website and move you up to the top of the search engines. It can take months before the needle starts moving significantly in terms of visibility. 

 

It’s also not a one-and-done process. Optimizing your website for search engines takes work. You’ll have to continue to post content or update the content you already have as well as optimize local directories.

 

As an FYI, there are faster ways to get your website seen on the search engines. Paid search results are one way to get people to click on your brand, and these show up instantly (as long as you have digital marketing specialists on your side).

Only Work with Search Engine Optimization Experts

Improving your healthcare website’s SEO value requires a lot of work and time. We don’t recommend doing this yourself or using an amateur to improve your SEO. SEO is changing every day, as Google shifts its algorithms.

 

Experts keep up on the news and know-how to optimize to Google’s ever-changing standards.

 

We also don’t recommend doing this with a company that only offers SEO services. The right strategy combines search engine optimization with whatever other services you need. These may include social media advertising, website design, and traditional media including TV and radio.

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Online reviews and HIPAA: What you need to know about responding to patient reviews

Online reviews and HIPAA: What you need to know about responding to patient reviews | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

HIPAA adds extra complications for healthcare providers facing negative online reviews. The common wisdom for most businesses is to respond to all negative feedback publicly. However, HIPAA levies large fines and penalties against providers who reveal personal health information without patient consent.

 

It’s no wonder then that most healthcare providers are gun-shy when it comes to responding to online reviews. Fewer than one in five have a process for dealing with bad reviews, even though more than 80% of providers are concerned about the damage reviews can cause.

 

That said, there are HIPAA-compliant ways of dealing with patient reviews, and you should definitely incorporate review responding into your practice routine.

Why responding to online reviews is so important

Especially given that healthcare can be a life-and-death matter, prospective patients pay a lot of attention to a provider’s online reviews. In fact, 94% of people use online reviews to evaluate physicians, and 75% say that review sites have influenced their choice of provider. As such, negative reviews on sites like Vitals.com, Healthgrades.com, RateMDs.com, Google, and Yelp can be especially damaging—destroying your online reputation and turning away prospective patients.

 

The good news is that most patients tend to write positive reviews. But when negative reviews do pop up, you can often turn them into good reviews by responding promptly in a caring, professional, and HIPAA-compliant manner.

 

These online interactions show potential customers how much you care about your patients’ satisfaction, which can significantly boost your online reputation. Moreover, responding thoughtfully to a negative review can cause a two-fifths of viewers to overlook it.

 

But you shouldn’t just respond to bad reviews; you should also respond to good reviews. In fact, 70% of people believe it’s important for healthcare providers to respond to all reviews online. Doing so not only demonstrates that you listen to your patients, but it also shows that you truly value them and are grateful for their feedback.

 

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The Beginner’s Guide to Online Review Management

The Beginner’s Guide to Online Review Management | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The Beginner’s Guide to Online Review Management

Make a List

Before you can begin your online review management and improvement, you have to know what you’re up against. Block out some time to do some research and audit your online business reputation. To start, search for your business as a customer might. What comes up first? Your website? Your Facebook Page? Your Google Business listing? A third-party site? Are these reviews reliable and made by real customers?

 

You’ll probably come across some negative reviews, but don’t worry about addressing them yet. At this stage, simply try to gather as much information as you can. In your list, record the following information about each result you find:

  • URL
  • Search engine results page (SERP) position
  • Number of reviews listed
  • Overall star-rating and/or overall sentiment (positive, negative, neutral)
  • Reviews appear to be made by real customers (or not)
  • Information within the reviews is accurate (or not)
  • Complaints in the reviews have been addressed (or not)

 

After the first page of results, do a quick scan to see if there are any particularly problematic results, like a blog post or local news story defaming your business. If you find these, add them to your list. If not, stick to the first page of results. Since most customers don’t scroll past the first page of results, it’s probably not worth your time to go past the first page either.

Prioritize Online Review Sources

At this point, you probably have 8 to 10 items on your online review management list. Most likely, you don’t have the time to manage all of these. Choose the sources that are most impactful, and prioritize managing those first.

Look at your research from the previous step and find which sites showed up first, which scores were bad, or any reviews that were obviously false. If any of the sites that showed up had ten or more positive reviews, you might skip these and move on to more urgent items. Remember your own website is important here too, especially if it shows up high on the SERP.

Established Businesses

If you’re a well-established business, you may find that you already have a number of positive reviews across a variety of sites. After all, you’ve been around this long because you do a good job and customers like you! In this case, you may want to take a closer look at the ROI of online reputation management. Your strategy can always be stronger, and you can reach more customers with well-placed reviews. To start, look for holes in your online reviews; are there any places customers are looking for you, but not finding you? If you don’t have a Facebook page, website, or other top online listings, these should be your priority.

New Businesses

New businesses may find a few relevant results to start. That’s okay. A clean slate is good; you have the opportunity to control the conversation around your business. You’ll want to prioritize the top spots on the SERP. Ideally, these will be your Google Business listing, website, and Facebook page. You can control some parts of what appears on your Google Business listing and Facebook page, and every aspect of your website, so make sure this information is accurate, and your SEO is good. If you don’t have any reviews in these places yet, this is a good place to start.    

Gather more reviews

Now that you have the information you need, you’ll need to bolster the reviews on your top-priority sites. Make a plan to gather more testimonials and direct customers to the site to post their reviews. There are several ways to do this, and which you choose will depend on where you want to gather more reviews and how you best interact with your customers. Here are a few ways you can ask for reviews;

  • Automated email campaign
  • In-store tablet or kiosk
  • Facebook campaign
  • Customer appreciation event
  • Contest or giveaway
  • Other unconventional ways

With the right plan, you can automate your testimonial gathering process in under one hour. Check out the Step-by-Step Guide to Automating Testimonial Collection.

Manage Your Online Reviews

If you have some reviews coming in through emails, some on YouTube, some on Facebook, and a number of other places, it’s going to get difficult to manage. Focus your reviews into one easy-to-use platform, and make sure customers know where to go to submit them. If you use Boast, you can request, gather, approve, and display text and video testimonials all in one place. You’ll also want to use a platform that integrates with your WordPress website, Facebook page, MailChimp account, and other services so you can use the reviews that you gather in more places. With these integrations, you can continue to manage your online reviews from one place, but use them in many different ways.

Monitor Your Online Reviews

Nothing online remains unchanged for very long, and your online reputation is no different. After you boost your reputation on your top-priority sites, including your own website, you’ll want to monitor these sites. You can set up Google Alerts with your company name as a keyword to see when new mentions go up anywhere online. It’s also a good idea to check back on your review sites periodically and thank customers who post reviews, and respond (where appropriate) to negative reviews or issues. Finally, keep gathering, posting and using testimonials in new ways. Some of the top brands in the world use testimonials to maintain their industry authority, engage customers, build community, and build trust.

 

Once you have a plan to manage online reviews, the process won’t seem so chaotic. Remember that building (or repairing) your reputation takes time, consistent effort, and exemplary service. If you continue to impress your customers and make it easy for them to show their approval, you’ll start to see more reviews rolling in.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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