Online Reputation Management for Doctors
17.2K views | +7 today
Follow
Online Reputation Management for Doctors
Curated and Written Articles to help Physicians and Other Healthcare Providers manage reputation online. Tips on Social media, SEO, Online Review Managements and Medical Websites
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

6 challenges doctors face with social media marketing

6 challenges doctors face with social media marketing | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Social media marketing has essentially become unavoidable. More than three-quarters of the U.S. population (79 percent) has at least one social media profile, according to Statista.

 

Furthermore, Statista estimates the number of social media users in the U.S. will rise from roughly 244 million in 2018 to approximately 257 million by 2023.

 

Given these numbers, standing out from the crowd on social media is important, but it isn’t easy.

 

Here’s some advice to help your practice overcome common challenges of healthcare social media.

1. Highlighting patient success stories without revealing PHI

Incorporating patient success stories into your social media marketing is a great way to promote your expertise.

 

However, be careful not to accidentally disclose PHI, as this can lead to a HIPAA violation.

 

Knowledge is the key to avoiding this, so know what constitutes PHI — i.e. using a patient’s name or nickname, their address or geographical location, dates they were treated, numbers that could identify them, and anything else that might compromise their identity.

 

When compiling patient success stories for social media, work with a legal professional to create patient marketing consent forms. Otherwise, only discuss patients in general terms without revealing PHI, and always triple-check content for potential privacy violations before posting.

2. Reaching their target patient base

A Facebook post has an organic reach of just 6.4 percent of a Page’s likes, according to We Are Social. However, the average paid reach is 27.3 percent higher than the average total reach. 

 

Given these numbers, it’s not surprising that 53 percent of companies use social advertising — i.e., purchasing ads on social networks — according to HootSuite. Facebook advertising and sponsored content can extend your social media reach to ensure your practice gets in front of your target patients.

 

Social media advertising campaigns can be created to fit any budget, and they’re effective. Nearly two-thirds of consumers (65 percent) will click through to learn more about social ads that appear on their screen, according to Sprout Social.

3. Determining good content to share

Growing your patient base is the overarching purpose for social media marketing, but coming on too strong will get you unfollowed fast. Generally speaking, approximately 80 percent of your content should be informative or interesting and 20 percent should be promotional.

 

When it comes to the type of content that performs best, no two audiences are the same. Carefully monitor your posts to see what types of content — i.e. pictures, videos, graphics, how-tos — as well as what subjects get the most engagement.

4. Finding time to share and engage

Proper social media management is a key component of an effective strategy. You won’t engage your patient base by posting content sporadically and occasionally responding to comments.

 

In fact, 52 percent of small businesses post on social media at least daily, according to Clutch. Schedule time on your calendar each day for social media marketing activities to make sure they don’t fall by the wayside. 

 

Of course, as a busy doctor, you might not have time to effectively manage your social media properties. In this case, delegate this task to a member of your staff or take on an outside social media partner.

5. Choosing the right social media platforms

Different demographics gravitate toward different social networks — i.e. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. If you don’t take the time to figure out where your patient base is, your medical social media efforts might be wasted on the wrong crowd.

 

For example, 64 percent of 18-to-29-year-olds are on Instagram, but only 40 percent of 30-to-49-year-olds have an account on the site, according to Sprout Social.

 

Maintaining social media accounts on multiple platforms will allow you to reach different demographics that fall into your target patient group.

6. Getting patients to share their content

The more your social media content is shared, the broader your reach. However, people don’t share just anything, so give them quality and compelling content they’re excited to share with their own networks.

 

Post on topics important to your patient base, take time to proofread for spelling and grammatical errors, and share information from credible sources. You can also hold a social media contest where entry involves sharing a certain post and tagging a friend or two.

 

Patients want to connect with you on social media, but simply having an account isn’t enough to promote your practice. Finding success in healthcare social media requires a significant time investment, but it’s well worth the effort.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Health Online Reputation Management Trends 2018

Health Online Reputation Management Trends 2018 | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

We are in the last month of 2017 and its time to think about the year 2018 and what it has in store for us. The evolving healthcare industry and digital marketing are also expected to carry this year’s trend and focus on many new things. The major booster for a successful practice will be online reputation. To stay ahead of your competition, you need to learn how to manage your practice’s online reputation. It is not just limited to reviews but management of your overall online presence. Check put below-stated strategies for easy success in the coming year 2018.

Practice website in 2018

Your website is the first and most trusted communication platform between you and your patients. As digital marketing is growing exponentially, it is imperative to have a stunning website for your practice in 2018. Your practice website needs to be

  • Responsive: Engagement is a real-time necessity. A non-responsive can hit your online presence and traffic website due to Google’s algorithm shifts. Your website should not just throw information on searchers rather promote conversation content with a patient portal, FAQ/comment section.
  • Mobile: In early 2018, Google is expected to launch mobile algorithm. So, your website should function flawlessly on mobile devices.
  • Faster loading: Whether on web or mobile, your website needs to load the pages faster. Slow loading is a disappointment for visitors, especially the millennials, thereby hurting your online reputation.
  • Mobile app: According to a study more than 61% people have downloaded mHealth apps. You can imagine the rise in number in the coming year. So, get a mobile health app for your practice.

The average viewer is expected to watch 36 minutes of online video per day on a mobile device, as opposed to 19 minutes on a computer. Source: Recode

Healthcare content marketing in 2018

Patients are becoming keen researchers where content plays the most important role in educating them about you and your practice. To flood with patients, invest in content

  • Diverse: Nobody like monotony especially when there is some informative and serious stuff to learn. Also, 2018 has a lot in store for content marketing, so your website should showcase different forms of content for higher engagement. Make use of blogs with pictures, infographics, or podcasts.
  • Video: Today, video is becoming the most liked form of content. Instead of reading a 2000 word blog, patients prefer watching an explanatory video of 2 minutes. Create videos on treatment, causes, and treatment of diseases, or testimonial videos.
  • Transparency: Your target audience, especially millennials are progressive ones who quench with authentic and transparent data. To win the competition in healthcare marketing, your patient should never consider you dishonest else your practice is to suffer a downfall.
  • Wide scope: Content is not limited to your practice blogs. You need to write effective and engaging content for your social media posts, emails, and paid advertisement, etc.

Content is the influences a patients journey from searching you online to planning a visit to your practice. It builds a relationship that leads to the creation of strong online reputation.

Healthcare SEO in 2018

For any of your web activity to reach masses or to get yourself ranked high in Google search you need to have amazing SEO. 2018 you will witness more patients searching healthcare services online, that requires you to optimize your website, blogs and other activities online.

  • SERP: In 2018, you cannot rely only on organic ranking. SERP features are expected to steal clicks from organic listings and searchers’ attention. So, track your ranking and check for SERP analysis.
  • Voice search: This technology is growing rapidly. 20% of searches are voice searches. This gives rise to the need for long-tail keywords and a natural language to communicate better with patients.
  • Backlink: Quality backlinks is what that will offer valuable consumer experience thereby declaring your practice trustworthy. In 2018 as well, inbound links will remain one of the most powerful ranking factors. This also means you need to stay extra conscious when doing guest posting as Google will have an eye on all your links.
  • User experience: According to Google, in 2018, the user experience will be rated higher than ever. This will increase engagement of patients over a page, helping search engine identify the most useful page for searchers.

Social media presence in 2018

The enormous popularity and necessity of social media in our lives does not need any explanation. More than 30% healthcare professionals have already joined social media platforms. So,

  • Grow presence: For better online reputation you need to have a strong online presence. So, you need to be present on popular social media sites, especially the ones created for doctors and medical practitioners.
  • Post pattern: An account left in idle state will not attract your target audience. It is not necessary to post something every day but in a regular pattern. It is mandatory to collect insights on peak engagement times on various social media platforms for your posts to get maximum views. You should create a calendar for posts and plan your weekly or monthly activities for every account.

Patient review management in 2018

Online reputation is directly dependent on the reviews you receive on various platforms. The reviews you receive are influenced by the above-mentioned pointers in addition to the services offered at your practice.

  • Current online reputation: First and foremost thing is to evaluate your present online reputation by Googling yourself. You should be aware of what’s being said about you and your practice on the Internet. You need to proactively monitor your online reputation on a daily basis.
  • Every patient is a reviewer: You need to understand that in the world of the Internet, people don’t hesitate to share their happiness or anger over a service or product. So, treat your existing or potential patients with utmost respect and care to make their visit to your practice memorable. Subsequently, you are likely to get bestowed with some positive reviews.
  • Request feedback: Positive online reviews are must for strengthening your online reputation. If you are unable to receive the desired number of positive feedback, request your happy patients to write for your practice. Ask them to leave a review about their experience to your practice and treatment.
  • No fake reviews: Say no to fake reviews. Just to improve your online reputation, writing fake reviews on a website can instead ruin your practice reputation. When scanning reviews, a site can remove or report review spam if the post seems unauthentic to the website.
  • Reply to reviews: Never ignore a review. Whether positive or negative, reply the review. Thank the reviewer for taking out time and writing for your practice online. Replying to negative review doesn’t mean arguing with a patient on the Internet. You should never sound unprofessional. Be courteous and take care of patient confidentiality laws. Try to take the discussion offline or promise betterment. Also, promote the positive reviews on your website.
  • Know about your competitors: Reputation management is not restricted to managing your profile, instead of researching the competition to know the trends and things that impact other patients. You need to know the reasons behind success and failure of your competition to improve your practice reputation.

Remember online reputation is a marathon, not a sprint. You cannot win this race in a day but following the above-mentioned will act as a nitro booster for your vehicle driving to establish strong health online reputation. Here are some quick tips to remember in this online journey or establishing positive online presence:

  • Invest more in paid advertisement
  • Transparency related to content on your website, services offered at practice and reviews.
  • Train your staff for better consumer experience.
  • Showcase your thought leader personality to grow trust of patients in your practice.
  • Don’t mix your private and professional life
  • Register your name as domain name for better SEO results
  • Remember to claim your Google Business Listing
  • Take help of professionals. Feel free to contact myPracticeReputation anytime for reputation management of your practice.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

5 Things Medical Professionals Should Know Before Using Facebook

5 Things Medical Professionals Should Know Before Using Facebook | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Facebook continues to be a conduit for connecting people with one another around the world, while also allowing businesses to communicate with their existing and potential customers. As a medical professional, it’s important to use Facebook as a channel to interact with your patients but with the right conduct in mind.

 

A medical professional should use a variety of marketing channels to build up a community around your practice, hospital or other type of medical facility. Social media is an important channel for building this connection with your customers by organically reaching them online where they are most active.

 

As of today, over 1 billion people are on the Facebook platform making it the social media network with the largest audience. There are multiple social networks medical professionals should be active on, but since Facebook is the social channel with the largest following; it’s prudent to understand how to present yourself on this network first.

 

Once you’ve established your personal conduct and marketing strategy on Facebook as a doctor or other healthcare professional, you can then begin to roll out how you’ll present yourself on Twitter, LinkedIn and other major social networks. It’s always important to have a structure approached to how you’re marketing yourself and in turn, your organization which is why you should focus on one network at a time before adding another social channel to be active on.

1. Match the Needs of Your Patients

Are you a nurse? A doctor? A therapist? Regardless of what type of medical professional you are, it is important to accommodate the needs of your patients and share your specific expertise before you begin connecting with current or former patients on Facebook.

Whether you’re active on your own personal Facebook profile or on a Facebook page for the larger organization you’re employed by, share news, tips and advice about your expertise whether it’d be fitness tips, ways to improve mental health, how to increase your metabolism etc.

As a medical professional, it’s your task to better the health of your patients and Facebook can help further echo your cause. Use Facebook and eventually other social channels to share actionable knowledge about your health care expertise.

Continue to share this information publicly with your growing network to match the expectations your current and future patients have about you as a professional or about your organization as a whole. A current patient will certainly find more value from you if you continue to deliver advice online as well as offline.

At this same time, it’s still okay to share personal content unrelated to your career on Facebook, just as long as the right people see this content. This can be controlled by editing the privacy of each post shared on the network.

 

To ensure that the content you’re sharing on Facebook is available publically to patients or privately to your personal network, visit the screen above when sharing career oriented material. Anything posted to Facebook can be set as public, private, only viewable to certain friends and to a few other options by clicking on the globe at the bottom right box where you share content.

Share any content that could benefit your patients to the public from your Facebook profile. If you’re using a Facebook page, all the content shared on that page is public by default.

2. Set Boundaries on Your Social Media Accounts

It’s critical that you set boundaries in terms of how you interact with patients on Facebook and social media from the beginning, before connecting with them or suggesting they like your Facebook page. When it comes to how you interact with current, future or former patients on Facebook, always respect their privacy and personal space.

On Facebook, your main goal as a medical professional is to provide valuable content and spur interesting discussions about your particular expertise in healthcare that will help remind your community of your in-depth knowledge on the subject for the next time they may need your medical advice.

The social network acts as a way of getting valuable expertise you have about health care to your patients in their newsfeed where they are active almost everyday. Communicating with your patients too frequently on Facebook or other social networks can be extremely off putting, uncomfortable and could completely tarnish your reputation.

 

Follow these rules to establish clear boundaries surrounding your social media use that will help strengthen your relationships and avoid offending anyone in your community.

*Keep your Facebook account clean and appropriate at all times, even when it comes to private posts.

*Always share accurate information with your community.

*Respect the privacy of your patient’s medical history at all times.

*If you’re ever in doubt when it comes to posting content, then wait to share that content and revisit it at another time.

*With privacy in mind, never identify anyone as a patient. Treat your community as neutral to avoid any conflict of interest.

*Ask permission to share content that isn’t yours to make sure you or your organization has the right to distribute it to your audience.

*Never ignore the requests of your community to ensure you’re respecting their needs and interests at all times. Listen to the feedback you’re receiving to make sure you’re making the most impact from your efforts.

*Educate yourself on Facebook best practices on a consistent basis to keep your knowledge of the platform and your community fresh.

*Let your patients and community members do a majority of the friending and liking to ensure it’s on their terms and doesn’t encroach on their personal space. Accept friend requests on a case-by-case basis and use your better judgment on who you should associate with online and who you shouldn’t.

3. Keep Privacy and Legal Concerns in Mind

Like mentioned above, privacy and legal concerns should be at the top of your mind when using Facebook professionally. Most medical professionals are familiar with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which requires that all patient related information be kept completely confidential.

In terms of Facebook, it’s illegal to even identify someone as a patient or reference anything related to their medical history. Discuss content on your Facebook and social profiles that isn’t patient specific to avoid any conflicts that break the doctor and patient confidentiality.

Stick to publishing tips, advice, industry news and other content that will help express your healthcare expertise without jeopardizing your career. Anything posted about your day to day as a medical professional could be used against you in a malpractice case, always be thoughtful about what you are and aren’t posting on Facebook.

Do not offer clinical advice on Facebook under any circumstance, always instruct a former, current or future patient to contact you or the proper medical professional to schedule a consultation appointment. Craft a response to these type of requests on Facebook that clearly directs people to contact you to schedule a consultation. By setting up a set of guidelines to follow in this specific circumstances, you’ll save time and avoid risking any potential conflicts.

The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) uses a few different responses to medical questions on their Facebook page to help avoid any potential issues. Take their example and craft your own response to any moments where clinical advice is being requested on Facebook or elsewhere.

4. Build a Strong Network of Connections

Using Facebook on a regular basis to build continued visibility around your medical profession is a form of content marketing. By continually sharing content around your expertise, you’ll begin to build expectations with your audience as to what type and what quality of content you’ll release in the future.

By sharing content that’s valuable to your audience on Facebook overtime, you’ll be able to build upon existing patient relationships and help spur new connections. As compared to traditional advertising, content is often viewed as more trustworthy by consumers and one of the most effective ways to get in front of these users is on Facebook.

When creating content, focus on how it’ll be presented on Facebook to best match the intricacies of the social network. Decide which of the content shared on Facebook will live solely on the platform, while others will be links to content on a blog, website or other social properties.

Define the right balance for your Facebook presence suited to the time and resources you have available. All content shared on Facebook should have a visual aspect, concise copy and a call to action with each post.

For instance, share a fitness tip on Facebook with a photo of the tip in action, about 85 characters explaining the fitness tip and possibly a call to action to read more about it on your blog.

By combining all those key elements in different combinations, your Facebook posts will get more interactions on the social platform in the form of likes, comments and shares and as a result, will hopefully make your network of connections much stronger.

5. Find the Balance Between Appropriate and Personal

There is a fine line between being both appropriate and personal on Facebook as a medical professional. By being appropriate, you’re limited in how personal you can be with your connections on the network but it’s possible. Don’t be the first to reach out to your patients publicly on Facebook, but instead extensively monitor their feedback on the content you’re sharing.

You can remain appropriate by not identifying that any one is your patient and not releasing any other sensitive data you’ve collected from your network. However, to make the feedback you’re receiving from your network useful and add a personal touch to your communication on Facebook, simply listen.

Your network of Facebook friends or fans will leave comments, messages and write on your timeline with feedback about your content, the industry and your services. If you’re actively listening to this feedback, you’ll be able to detect patterns from your Facebook connections that can help inform what type of information is shared in the future, which type of content to prepare in the long-term and more.

Personalization across any profession is all about catering to the specific needs of different customers, which in this case is your patients. Give your patients the information they’re looking for on Facebook and you will continue to see increased interactions on your content and more trust between your network in terms of your credibility.

The more you listen and react to the constructive feedback you receive, the more excited your network of Facebook connections will be to interact with you on Facebook again. The most ideal circumstance is being recognized as a reliable source of information on a particular healthcare topic and that you really listen to the input of Facebook friends and fans.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How to Use Twitter for Healthcare Effectively (4 Tips)

How to Use Twitter for Healthcare Effectively (4 Tips) | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

With Twitter going public this year, it has over 100 million daily active users and 231.7 million monthly active users worldwide to date. There are lots of opportunities for conversation on the platform about almost every topic known to man, but where does healthcare fit in on Twitter as an industry?

 

The very nature of healthcare requires many regulations, which is often a barrier for medical professionals looking to utilize the platform, but it certainly doesn’t merit not using the social media channel to communicate with others. As of today, 31% of health care professionals use social media for professional networking which is only going to grow as one of the many effective uses of Twitter for medical practitioners.

Using Twitter and other social channels is also important to patients, since 41% of people say social media would affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital or medical facility and 30% of adults say they are likely to share information about their health on social media sites with other patients.

Continuing ongoing communication with your audience on Twitter can have long-term benefits for you as a professional and for your healthcare organization, as well as a tangible impact on your patients. This positive impact can occur when the platform is used correctly to develop relationships and spread worthwhile information to your audience of colleagues, experts, patients and industry leaders.

Here’s how you and your organization should be using Twitter for healthcare effectively:

Spread Quality Health Related Information: Both Curated & Original

Twitter allows its users to become a source of knowledge and expertise about certain topics and in this case, you should be tweeting about your healthcare related information. The goals of a medical professional on Twitter are to build a following of other people and organizations that care about your messaging and associate your expertise with your account.

It isn’t the overall number of followers that matter, but the number of your followers who actually care about what you’re tweeting. If you’re a dentist, then tweet content about how to maintain your smile in between visits or if you’re a nutritionist, tweet tips about shopping for and cooking healthy meals. Tweet the expertise that you know well, to give your audience of like-minded individuals the information they’ve come to expect from your account.

The content you’re sharing on Twitter should be both original, as well as the curated content from others. Share your own quick tips, links to your blog posts, news about your industry and more original content that you’ve created based on your expertise. The other content you’re sharing on Twitter should be the relevant content from others in your industry, friends, partners and followers.

Tweeting a healthy balance of your content and the content of others is the best approach to Twitter because no one wants to hear you talk only about yourself in real life and the same goes for your conduct on Twitter. The content you’re sharing from others should always be relevant to the topics you’re typically covering in healthcare professionally on Twitter and occasionally your personal interests as well.

Share the articles of others, retweet the tweets of others in the healthcare industry that you find valuable, comment on the tweets and article links of others in your network and aim to share the quality content you discover on Twitter. This approach helps vary the content you’re sharing with your audience, as well as build a rapport with others in your industry on Twitter.

Use the Right Hashtags for Healthcare

Hashtags on Twitter are often misunderstood by many, resulting in a common misuse of this helpful tool for content discovery. Twitter hashtags for healthcare can be used to help categorize your content on a consistent basis, extend the reach of your tweets with others looking for the type of content you’re tweeting and help expand your audience with like-minded individuals all with the use of # symbol for a word or phrase.

 

As a Twitter user, it’s important to use no more than three hashtags per tweet to avoid overusing this helpful technique. The hashtags you’re using should be a combination of hashtags used in your industry by others, as well as a few hashtags created by you specifically to categorize your content.

 

When creating original hashtags of your own, keep them very simple and easy to understand. Avoid stringing too many words together, while focusing on the creation oF hashtags that you’ll look to use again in the future as opposed to one-offs that you won’t have use for again.

 

When it comes to Twitter hashtags in general, stick to using the same 10-15 hashtags overtime to create a consistent flow and organization to all your healthcare content shared on Twitter. After consistently tweeting using certain hashtags, your audience will begin to expect their use from your account and be on the lookout for certain series of content you regularly tweet.

Hashtags used by others can help you find engaging content from others on the topics you’re most interested about, which makes the process of content curation on Twitter much more effective.

Communicate with Others Frequently

By sharing the content of others in your industry on a regular basis you’re communicating with them and building a long lasting rapport. Sharing the content of others on Twitter is one of the most valuable things you can do when interacting on the network, but it doesn’t have to stop there.

When other voices in the healthcare industry are tweeting, it’s important to interact with their tweets by leaving a comment, thanking them for sharing the resources, asking a question, refuting their position constructively and more to drive a more in-depth one on one conversation. It is easier for another medical professional to ignore the fact you’re tweeting their content or retweeting their tweets, but more difficult to ignore a direct mention which is a call for one-to-one conversation.

 

Interact with their tweets and ask questions to build an ongoing dialogue with other members of your industry within healthcare. Most importantly, try to take some of these relationships you’re building on Twitter offline into the real world. Invite some of the medical professionals you’re tweeting with the most to meet with you for coffee, have lunch, grab a drink at a bar or even attend a networking event together.

Meeting one of your connections face-to-face helps establish a long-term relationship that may not of been as strong without the in-person meeting. You can continue to maintain your professional relationship overtime with new and existing contacts through Twitter.

Unfortunately, it isn’t possible to meet with all of your followers on Twitter since it’s likely you don’t live in the same physical location. Using Twitter chats is another alternative way to connect with healthcare professionals interested in discussing the industry and other important professional developments.

 

A Twitter chat is a live discussion that occurs for a half-hour to an hour at the same time every week, moderated by a host on Twitter and centered on a particular topic in the form of a hashtag allowing anyone that is interested in participating to follow. Twitter chats are wonderful networking opportunities for your specific medical focus since each chat is centered on a specific subject area.

Therefore, when you’re participating in the chat, you’re more likely to be seen by and interact with individuals that share an interest with you as a medical professional. These connections will hopefully lead to more opportunities to connect with others, build thought leadership and build greater visibility for your practice.

Follow the Rules as a Twitter User & a Healthcare Professional

One of the most important rules for using Twitter as a healthcare professional is respecting the rules and regulations of your position. First and foremost, upholding HIPAA by respecting the privacy of your patients is critical for your ongoing success with social media.

Do not directly reference anyone as a patient when using Twitter or a similar tool, since by even recognizing someone as a patient you’re breaking confidentiality regulations.

 

It is also important to avoid administering clinical advice on Twitter or other social platforms to individuals. It is always recommended that you refer them to set up an appointment at your organization or with another qualified medical professional for proper consultation.

Besides the healthcare related concerns, there are Twitter rules to follow as well to ensure you’re making the most of the platform while not negatively affecting yourself or others. Don’t tweet for the sake of tweeting, only share content on Twitter that’s going to bring value to your audience.

 

Tweet when people are most likely to see your content like at 9am, 12pm, 3pm and 5pm. Use scheduling tools like HootSuite or Buffer app to help improve your ability to deliver engaging content on Twitter, while saving time for one-on-one conversations as opposed to the organization of when you’ll be tweeting.

Like mentioned above, don’t overuse hashtags especially since it is often one of the most common rules broken by individuals. Don’t tweet at other Twitter users excessively to get interactions with them, but find a healthy balance between persistence and patience.

 

Use links in your tweets often, since they are one of the most engaging types of tweets on Twitter. Also, look to experiment with the use of photos in your tweets to garner the most engagement from your audience in the Twitter feed.

Lastly, don’t tweet when you’re angry or drinking. Always use common sense and think before you’re tweeting because as a medical professional, Twitter could seriously impact your career negatively if not used correctly.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

5 Simple Ways Physicians Can Boost Their Online Presence

5 Simple Ways Physicians Can Boost Their Online Presence | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

It’s safe to say that by now, most professionals within the healthcare industry understand the importance of a solid web presence when it comes to attracting new patients and holding onto existing ones. The internet, and search in particular, has fundamentally altered the patient path to treatment, empowering healthcare consumers to conduct their own research and make their own decisions when seeking out treatment options.

As a result, many medical practices are scrambling to establish their online presence and capitalize on these consumer-driven trends — however, it’s important to recognize that in an increasingly competitive local health market, simply throwing up a website and a few digital ads isn’t going to cut it anymore. Here are five ways that physicians can optimize their digital marketing efforts and stay one step ahead of the competition.

1. From One Patient to Another

Peer reviews have become the gold standard of quality control — in fact, 90% of 18-24 year-olds say they trust medical information shared by peers on the internet. While, at the end of the day, the content of online reviews may be out of your hands, there’s a lot you can do to garner a favorable rating for your practice on these sites.

First, claim your profile on popular review sites like Yelp, ZocDoc, Healthgrades, and Vitals. Many of these sites offer “freemium” services (or free services with the option of paid upgrades), making them a quick and easy way to increase your visibility online. It’s also a good idea to encourage satisfied patients to actually go to some of these sites and spread the word about their positive experience at your practice. Not only does this enhance your online brand, but it helps bury and mitigate the damage from any potential negative reviews you may have.

2. Get a Listing on Google My Business

There’s no denying that when it comes to digital marketing, Google reigns supreme. While search engine marketing (SEM) and search engine optimization (SEO) are, of course, vitally important, many medical marketers spend all their time and energy on these areas, overlooking a number of impactful platforms and tactics as a result. One such platform, Google My Business, is a medical practice’s one-stop-shop for directory listing optimization. Subscribers’ business information appears on Search, Maps, Google+, and Google Places. This means that prospective patients can easily find your practice, regardless of where they are or what kind of device they’re using.

3. Mobile Matters

Today, about 72% of American adults own a smartphone, and about 62% of those users report using their mobile devices to seek out health-related information. In response to these trends, Google updated its search engine algorithm to give preferential treatment to mobile-optimized websites back in early 2015. Since then, any physician who wants to boost his or her practice’s ranking in Google’s organic search results must ensure that their website is “mobile-friendly.” To see if your current website is up to snuff, copy/paste the URL into Google’s handy Mobile Friendly Tester.

4. Blog, Blog, and Blog Some More

Here’s some advice that translates over from the pre-digital world: it’s a lot easier to find something when there’s a lot of it. Consistent blog publishing is a great way to not only claim more online real estate, but also to strengthen patient trust in your brand and establish yourself as an industry thought leader. Write posts that will resonate with your target audience and demonstrate your specific areas of expertise. Enhance the SEO value of your content by crafting keyword-heavy titles and interlinking with other pages and blog posts on your site. That said, don’t overload your articles with anchor links and overly-promotional calls to action (CTAs).

5. Never Underestimate the Social Network

Social signals, or the activity generated on social media around ‘likes’, ‘shares’, and ‘retweets’, can have a huge bearing on where your site appears in Google searches. While the exact SEO impact of social signals is difficult to pin down, there are certain ways to easily increase your online presence through clever social media usage.

Aim to regularly post content that people would want to "like" or, ideally, "share." Each share will expose your post to new potential patients, while simultaneously boosting your ranking in Google searches. Remember: you’re trying to connect with patients, so your content needs to appeal to people outside of the medical profession. As with blog posts, you should post regularly to maintain an engaged following. Finally, be sure to utilize all of the major social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, and LinkedIn.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Should We Use Social Media to Diagnose Diseases?

Should We Use Social Media to Diagnose Diseases? | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Last month, I wrote an article called “3 Amazing Ways Google Search Data is Improving Healthcare,” that discussed the notion of using search engine data to diagnose illness before patients are even aware that they might be sick.

 

I recently came across a Wired article by Dr. Sam Volchenboum, the Director of the Center for Research Informatics at the University of Chicago, and a co-founder of Litmus Health, a data science provider for early-stage clinical trials, that explored this idea in depth. Here are a few of the key takeaways from his piece.

Data, Data Everywhere

From a data science perspective, says Dr. Volchenboum, the world is effectively becoming “one big clinical trial.” Internet search, social media, mobile devices, wearables, etc. are generating a steady — and staggeringly large — stream of information that “can provide insights into a person’s health and well-being.”

We’re not quite there yet, but it’s entirely possible that in the very near future, platforms like Facebook and Google will be able to alert someone to the possible presence of a disease before they’re even aware of it. While, in theory, this kind of technology would have the potential to save lives, Dr. Volchenboum aptly points out that when it comes to electronic patient health data, it’s never black and white.

How Does it Work?

In order to create a predictive model, a platform like Facebook would have to start by working backwards. Dr. Volchenboum explains, it would generate “a data set consisting of social media posts from tens of thousands of people will likely chronicle the journey that some had on their way to a diagnosis of cancer, depression, or inflammatory bowel disease.”

Then, using machine-learning technologies, a researcher or provider could analyze all of those disparate data points, taking into account the “language, style, and content of those posts both before and after the diagnosis.” This would allow them to create models capable of identifying similar behavior, which, in theory, would suggest a similar outcome down the road.

While such “early warning systems” are not yet in place, the underlying technology necessary to develop them certainly exists — the advanced predictive and machine-learning algorithms powering Facebook and Google’s advertising platforms basically use the same concept, but simply employ them to different ends.

A Double-Edged Sword?

I agree with Dr. Volchenboum that yes, we should start leveraging the vast amounts of consumer data in ways that benefit society as a whole, but that we also need to be very careful if and when we attempt to do so.

As we all know, the companies behind today’s biggest digital platforms detail how they plan to use consumer data in their terms of service; but as we also all know, few people actually take the time to read the terms of service. So, while these companies may be covered from a legal perspective, they’re not actually providing a functional window for patients who may be concerned about where their data ends up.

If this is the path we ultimately go down (and I’m quite sure it will be), we need to make sure it’s a highly transparent, opt-in system for those patients interested in participating. That means spelling it all out in terms that patients can actually understand, ensuring their data remains protected, and, if they choose not to participate, respecting that decision and keeping their data private. As patients continue to take a more active role in their health and treatment decisions, it’s likely that many would be in favor of this kind of technology — we just need to make sure it’s built upon a foundation of trust and respect.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

5 Tools to Grow your Online Presence for Doctors

5 Tools to Grow your Online Presence for Doctors | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Learning how to grow your online presence for doctors is a true challenge. It is something that must be done above and beyond running your medical practice. Your team may be able to help to grow your online presence, but a great deal of the work must also be done by the doctors themselves.

Online media tools for doctors are confusing and complex. Many doctors feel overwhelmed just learning all the names of each site, let alone using them.

Here are 5 tools to grow your online presence for doctors:

1) Doximity

More than 500,000 healthcare professionals have joined and use this social media platform exclusively for the medical community. Create an account to grow your influence within the medical community. You can also catch up on the latest medical news updates and read journal articles directly on the site.

2) Scoop

Scoop is designed for content creators to share their new articles videos and news all in once place. Doctors can benefit from this by going directly to aggregated feeds. It is a great way to grow your online presence for doctors, as you can find the latest news to share on social platforms. Doctors have access to the latest ideas and trends, and are able to share them. This gives you influence and a position as an authority in your field.

3) Mention

Think of mention as your virtual press agent. If you want to grow your online presence, Mention is a helpful tool to check out. The site is actually a set of tracking tools to help you monitor what people are saying about you on social platforms. It also tracks the activity of other online medical influencers and lets you connect with them. It also has an excellent blogfor learning more about social media and online presence which can be very valuable for doctors.

4) Quora

Want to be recognized as an online medical expert? Then take some time and answer important questions for patients and online searchers. think of Quora as the online FAQ center of the internet. Visit the section specifically for Medicine and Healthcare to get a sense of what people want to know. The more you share the more you can grow your online influence.

5) Hootsuite

To save time while try to grow your online presence as a doctor, look no further than hootsuite. Think of it as your personal assistant. The software can schedule your social posts and offer suggestions of valuable material to share.

Hootsuite offer very affordable tools that will also you monitor all your social media activity in one place. You can respond to comments, post updates, and more from inside the site.

These are just 5 tools that can help grow your online presence for doctors. There are many more nuanced tools and strategies. The more you learn about this new world of online influence, the better you can compete and become known as a doctor or value and credibility in the world.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

A Healthy Approach to Social Media

A Healthy Approach to Social Media | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

In today’s fast-paced society, everyone and their mother is on some sort of social media—Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter or Instagram, just to name a few. Social media has changed not only the way we communicate, but also the way that we get our information. More than 40% of consumers say that information found via social media affects the way that they deal with their health: What’s the latest workout? What’s the best diet? Who’s doing CrossFit? With so many new fitness crazes popping up, most people can be found with at least one health-related app.

Popular health and fitness websites such as WebMD and MyFitnessPal have generated their own online forums for users to share messages and information. (I, too, am guilty of looking up a symptom or two on WebMD.) 

What’s the draw? Why do people choose to use social media as their go-to for medical questions and answers? Instant gratification. Nowadays we’ve become so conditioned to receiving answers in seconds that waiting a day for test results seems unreasonable. It’s so much easier to punch in your symptoms on Google rather than making an appointment at the doctor.

But it doesn’t need to be an either/or decision. Healthcare providers can use social media to their—and their patients’—advantage. Overworked nurses and pediatricians could save valuable hours teaching kids how to properly fit a bike helmet by uploading a single YouTube video. A doctor could discuss a complicated procedure with a nervous patient, provide more information, and greater peace of mind, by referring them to a video or an article—or better yet, having that video or article on hand in their office.

I’m not saying that every health facility should run out and create an app. However, every facility should, in fact, have a strong social media focus no matter their size. With all of the health-related discussions constantly filling newsfeeds, providing the right content where people are spending a majority of their time is part of modern medicine.

Social media is important for healthcare providers to stay in communication with past, present and future patients. Like it, tweet it, pin it. Get the real facts out there. The world is online and moving forward. The fact of the matter is: If you aren’t on social media, then you’re far behind the learning curve.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

“The Doctor Will Tweet You Now”

“The Doctor Will Tweet You Now” | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The rise and availability of social media has affected almost every aspect of our daily lives. Is your kid’s school delayed because of snow? Better check the school’s Facebook page. Considering buying your first home? Your lender just tweeted a 2016 Homebuyers’ Report. Curious about how the president spends his days? Just look at his Instagram feed. Therefore, it shouldn’t come as a surprise the way people approach healthcare has changed, too. This blog has discussed digital strategy for healthcare practices, so here are a few social media-specific guidelines.

  • It’s all about the apps. About 20% of smartphone users utilize at least one health app on their phone. The most popular types relate to exercise, diet and weight. Though every healthcare facility doesn’t necessarily need an app, it’s important to have a strong mobile marketing focus. Many health providers have mobile patient access portals to keep pace with the growing digital world.
  • Putting the “me” in treatment. Social media has allowed patients to take a more active role in their healthcare. Whether it’s researching ailments, posting on forum, or joining support groups, more patients are becoming their own advocates when it comes to their health. Rather than relying solely on doctors to diagnose and determine the best course of treatment, patients are actively joining the discussion with diagnoses and treatment plans compiled from research and the advice or experience of others.
  • There’s no such thing as bad publicity… unless you’re in healthcare. Roughly 41% of people said social media affects their choice of a doctor, hospital or medical facility. Not only are patients able to post their positive—or negative—experiences on their own social media platforms, but sites like HealthGrades.com, RateMDs.com and Vitals.com allow them to score providers on everything from ease of appointment setting to bedside demeanor and professionalism of office staff. It’s imperative that healthcare organizations pay close attention to the way they are represented to current and potential patients.
  • Seeing is believing. According to a think with Google research study, YouTube traffic to hospital sites has increased 119% year-over-year, and 30% of patients who watched an online video booked an appointment. Videos more effectively highlight the value of facilities and the human elements of the providers.
  • On call 24/7. Along with this streamlined form of patient and physician communication comes heightened expectations. According to those polled during a study by the Health Research Institute at PwC, 49% of people expect to hear from their physician within a few hours of requesting an appointment or engaging in a follow-up discussion via social media.

Social media outlets have become so omnipresent in our culture that they’ve changed the way healthcare professionals and facilities operate and approach patient relationships. With each new development in technology comes another way a healthcare practitioner must upgrade to engage—or risk losing a patient to one who does.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Three Things Physicians Should Know about Social Media

Three Things Physicians Should Know about Social Media | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Like many Americans, physicians have discovered the value of social media. Whether they seek to market their practices, educate consumers about health concerns, or engage with patients online, many physicians see the potential in an economic way to reach large audiences quickly via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and other sites.


Over 70 percent of family physicians and oncologists use social media more than once a month, according to one survey. Another benefit, clearly, is these sites allow physicians to keep up with news and trends relating to health, medicine and patient care.


Physicians, and all healthcare professionals, should understand the risks of using social media improperly, as these risks could easily outweigh the benefits. Using social media inappropriately could lead to a liability suit that could damage a physician’s reputation or could cause the release of confidential patient information.


The release of patient information would violate HIPAA, which requires physicians and all healthcare entities to safeguard what it calls protected health information (PHI). The law defines PHI as any individually identifiable health information that medical practice or any associate of the practice maintains or transmits in any form. Such a broad definition makes physicians, anyone working for the practice and any vendor who contracts with the practice potentially liable if PHI is released to the public.


Several organizations, including the AMA and the American Association of Family Physicians, have published guidelines for social media use. Another excellent source of such guidance comes from the Federation of State Medical Boards, the group that represents the agencies in every state that discipline physicians. The federation’s 14-page Model Policy Guidelines for the Appropriate Use of Social Media and Social Networking in Medical Practice, is designed to educate state boards on social media. In one section of the guidelines, the federation outlines its recommendations for physicians who use social media and social networking personally and professionally. It recommends following these three steps, saying physicians should:


1. Limit discussions with patients about medical treatment. Therefore, they should never do so on personal social networking sites because anyone with access to these sites could view a physician’s comments about a patient’s care.


2. Provide no information that could identify patients because doing so could be a HIPAA violation.


3. Assume all risks related to the security, privacy and confidentiality of their posts when posting online. Assuming such risk means that when moderating any website, physicians should delete inaccurate information and posts that violate the privacy and confidentiality of patients or that are unprofessional.


Perhaps the best way to sum up the federation’s advice is this — always be professional. Always follow the same principles of professionalism online as you would offline. Use separate accounts for personal and professional social networking sites and for email. This way you can maintain professionalism and confidentiality in your professional postings and still enjoy personal, more casual conversations where appropriate on your personal sites.

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Doctors and Their Online Reputation

Doctors and Their Online Reputation | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

When a doctor I know recently signed up for a Twitter account, his colleagues began teasing him. “Are you going to tweet what you eat?” one joked.

Their questions, though, soon turned serious. How often was he going to tweet? What would he do if patients asked for medical advice on Twitter? Did he make up a name or use his real one?

“Doesn’t it make you nervous to put yourself ‘out there’?” asked one doctor, a respected clinician and researcher who prided herself on her facility with technology … but only at home. “I refuse to look myself up on Google,” she said. “Quite honestly, I’m not sure what I’d do with what I might find.”

While most doctors have come to terms with the fact that their patients routinely go online for information about what ails them, they remain uneasy about a more recent trend: the Internet is quickly becoming the resource of choice for patients to connect with, learn more about and even rate their doctors. And while many have used Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or online medical community sites like Sermo to engage with friends and colleagues, few have communicated with patients as, well,doctors. Most abstain for one simple reason: they aren’t sure how to be a doctor online.

Since starting his blog, KevinMD, nearly 10 years ago, Dr. Pho has become a rock star among the health care set, one of the few doctors recognizable by first name only. A primary care doctor, Dr. Pho presides over a social media empire that includes his blog, now a highly coveted publishing place for doctors and patients, a lively Facebook page and anonstop Twitter stream that has become must-follow fodder for the medical Digirati.

Now he and Susan Gay, a medical publisher, have written a book to help doctors do nearly the same. In“Establishing, Managing and Protecting Your Online Reputation: A Social Media Guide for Physicians and Medical Practices,” Dr. Pho and Ms. Gay offer highly organized key points, useful statistics and exuberant testimonials from doctors who have successfully leapt over the digital divide. There is plenty of practical advice, too, on topics ranging from what to post and when to engage, confer or rebuff, to how to decide what might be unethical or T.M.I. (Answer: “Can you say it aloud in a full hospital elevator?”)

The book is an excellent and helpful resource. But what elevates it beyond the category of valuable how-to manual is the passionate call to arms that resonates from all those well-enumerated directions and clearly labeled diagrams. Like it or not, the authors warn, the Internet has profoundly changed the patient-doctor relationship, and doctors must embrace its effects on patient care — or risk losing their own influence.

This is a social media manifesto for physicians.

Doctors need to be on social media because “that’s where the patients are going to be,” Dr. Pho and Ms. Gay state early on in the book. But it’s a wild world out there, they caution, where survival is based not on fitness but on presence. Invoking one of the most contentious health care topics on the Internet, childhood vaccines, they describe how the Internet has put the opinions of celebrities, politicians and “people who took their last science course in high school” on equal footing with experts who have devoted their careers to studying and researching the issue.

But doctors have lost their voice, and therefore their authority, because they have opted to ignore rather than embrace the Internet, the authors say. As a result, they are now saddled with the “much harder job” of dispelling myths and calming patients’ fears. It’s a situation that might have been prevented if doctors, like the celebrities, had stacked the YouTube, blog and Twitter decks, but with information that was confirmed by research and not coffee-klatch chatter.

Dr. Pho and Ms. Gay’s exhortations ramp up when it comes to the area that unnerves doctors most, online rankings. Again, presence trumps absence, and they urge readers to begin “claiming your identity” by Googling themselves. They offer the cautionary tale of a doctor who, only after Googling herself, discovers she has the same name as an eye doctor accused of willfully blinding patients. Armed with this information, the doctor begins using her nickname in person and online, thus differentiating herself from the delinquent doppelganger.

“The biggest risk of social media in health care,” they conclude, “is not using it at all.”

If there is a weakness in the book, it is its tendency to rely on platitudes of self-empowerment and slip into pedestrian prose. But thanks to the heady message in this manual cum manifesto, I’m pretty sure that I won’t be the only one to forgive Dr. Pho and Ms. Gay their literary lapses. Instead I will focus on their earnest appeal, made more compelling every time a patient asks if I or my colleagues blog, tweet or have a Facebook page. There will be all the other doctors who have chosen to care about their patients by working not only on the wards and in the clinics but also online.

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Manage Your Online Reputation

5 Ways to Manage Your Online Reputation | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Online Reputation Management for Doctors can be more crucial than  any other industry. In this information age reviews can make or break a practice. Follow these tips below and get the recommendations that match your skill set.


1)      Ask Your Happy Patients to Write a Review: Don’t be afraid to ask, because it certainly won’t hurt if your patient is leaving happy. Follow up with your patients – you can ask them directly for a review, or you can point them to a  website like healthgrades.com, vitals.com or ratemds.com


2)      Post Your Positive Reviews: In your office on a bulletin board, your website, blog and social media. The more attention you drive to the good, the less attention will be given to the poor.


3)      Google Yourself: Search for your name both for text and in images. Also, set up aGoogle Alert and you’ll get new results emailed to you based on the search criteria you specify. You’ll be notified immediately if any new reviews pop up.


4)      Get Active on Social Media: Social media is more relevant in today’s purchasing process. Get engaged with your followers to foster better relationships with the people who care enough to post online about their experience.


5)      Respond to Negative Reviews: Don’t just ignore them, because they won’t go away. Responding to negative reviews shows that you care about your patients, even and especially about the ones that left unhappy. But don’t just apologize; you need to make sure your response is well thought out, sincere, and that it addresses the issues and explains why future patients will not experience the same issues in the future.

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Responding to Negative Online Patient Reviews: 7 Tips

Responding to Negative Online Patient Reviews: 7 Tips | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

When you read a negative review of your medical skills or professional practice, your first instinct may be to fire back a response. You want to explain that the patient misstated the facts, she misinterpreted your explanation of a diagnosis, or exaggerated how your staff treated her.

Some physician review websites allow you to respond to an online review. For example, on RateMDs, you may reply to any of your reviews. However, on other sites, the response is not as prominently displayed as the initial review or may require the user to click on a separate button to view the responses.

As a general matter, I advise clients to respond online to negative reviews. Responding online shows prospective patients that you acknowledge criticism of your practice and that you are proactive in improving your patient's experience in your practice. Plus, if the negative review is completely at odds with other positive reviews, you may be able to explain why this patient had such a negative experience.

Here are seven tips for responding online to negative reviews:

1. Follow HIPAA. The medical profession is uniquely hampered in its ability to respond to online reviews because of patient privacy laws. You simply cannot disclose any protected health information in your response, because the patient has not given you consent to do so. The fact that the patient may have disclosed private information in his initial review does not give you permission to do the same in response. Given the seriousness of this concern, it is always better to err on the side of saying too little than too much. The fines associated with HIPAA or state privacy law violations may deter you from responding at all.

2. Be careful responding to anonymous reviews. The anonymity of some online reviews can make it difficult — or impossible — to respond. The review websites will not disclose the reviewer's true identity to you. If you do not know with absolute certainty who posted the negative review, then do not respond with any remarks specific to that patient. You do not want to risk responding to the wrong patient.

3. Keep the response short and polite. There's no reason to post a lengthy response. It will only look defensive to other patients. One way to promote a polite review is to avoid responding in anger. If you read a negative review, go ahead and draft your "dream" response. Then wait one day or two days, then re-read your draft response before posting it. It is also a good idea to enlist a trusted friend or family member to review your response and provide feedback about how the review sounds to a disinterested observer.

4. Show a commitment to improvement. Although review websites frustrate doctors to no end, keep in mind that they are one of the few methods by which you can get honest feedback. Your response to negative reviews will be most effective if they demonstrate that you want to improve your practice in response to fair criticism.

5. Invite the patient to contact you off-line. In your response, you can invite the patient to call you to discuss the problem and devise a solution together. It may not work with this particular patient, but it demonstrates to anyone who reads the negative review that you are willing to formulate a reasonable solution to patient concerns.

6. Do not defame anyone in your response. I once represented a client in the construction industry who had been defamed on Yelp. He had completed several small construction projects at a former schoolmate's home but she refused to pay him anything. Then she posted negative reviews on Yelp, accusing him of stealing jewelry and trespassing on her property. He responded to her review online and stated "If theft was made, it was her stealing money and services from me," among other explanations of what had happened. Although at trial we prevailed on our defamation claims against the customer, my client was also found to have defamed his customer in his online response. If you do choose to post a reply, keep this risk in mind.

7. Avoid apologies in some situations. There are times when a simple apology works well. For example, if the patient complains that your office always runs 15 minutes behind schedule, you could apologize and explain that because you try not to rush patients during examinations, sometimes patients have short wait times. However, there are times when you have to avoid an apology. For example, if the review accuses you of malpractice or other wrongdoing, an apology may not be the right approach given the possible legal liabilities at play.


No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

What Successful Doctors Know About Branding Themselves Online

What Successful Doctors Know About Branding Themselves Online | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Branding and marketing are as crucial to the highly personal, service-based healthcare sector as they are to any other industry. Regardless of a physician’s specialty, a branding strategy allows him or her to maintain a considerable amount of control over how patients perceive and interact with the practice.

 

In the digital age, the most important place that a professional within the healthcare community must focus his or her branding efforts is online. To do so effectively, there are three important aspects of healthcare branding to consider: the value that online branding holds for the modern practice, how healthcare professionals should approach brand-building in the digital space, and the most effective ways to reinforce the online reputation that one cultivates, in-person.

Why an online brand is important for healthcare providers

It sets you apart from the competition

In every discipline, trained healthcare professionals are automatically recognized as experts by the people who come to them for treatment. While this is undeniably beneficial, it also poses a problem if you want to differentiate yourself from other doctors who share your specialty.

 

A prospective patient is likely to consider that your abilities and those of your competition are of an overall equal level, making it difficult to set your skills apart to draw in clients. Branding is the best tool you have to distinguish yourself from other doctors and show your patients why you are better suited to meet their needs.

It establishes clear, consistent expectations for patients

When a patient chooses you as a provider, they are not just concerned about the quality of your services—they are also concerned about how their overall experience with your practice will make them feel.

 

Developing a well-defined brand that extends beyond your online persona and into the workplace culture of your practice helps set patient expectations before their first visit. When you follow through in-office with the promises you make via branding, patients feel that their expectations have been met, which lays the foundation for a positive, trustworthy reputation.

It builds loyalty

Repeated patient satisfaction breeds feelings of loyalty and brings long term stability to your practice. According to this research conducted by Gallup, the five aspects of a healthcare practice that predict a high degree of patient loyalty are satisfaction, reputation, effective problem resolution, staff follow-through, and staff that treat patients with respect and dignity.

 

Branding is the first step you can take toward establishing a healthcare business capable of offering its clientele each of these things.

How to build your professional brand online

Evaluate your current online brand

Begin building your brand by researching where your brand currently stands. Run your name through search engines and identify any potential content that might be damaging your reputation and driving business away, and pay special attention to your patient reviews. According to this 2017 consumer review survey from Bright Local, 85 percent of consumers are likely to trust online reviews equally as much as personal recommendations, so what your patients say about you on the internet matters.

 

Many healthcare professionals are surprised by what’s being said about them online, whether it’s positive or negative, and want to weigh in. However, it’s important to keep patient confidentiality foremost in your mind when looking through your search results. There are moments where you’ll have to accept that you can’t tell your side of the story.

Are online reputation issues hurting your practice?Let us help

Showcase your professional philosophy online

An essential part of building a distinct brand that will set you apart from your competition is effectively showcasing your professional philosophy online. To do this, you must evaluate what your values are as a doctor as well as the approach you prefer to take to provide patients with the best possible care.

 

For example, do you treat patients narrowly, targeting the symptoms, or do you look at their whole lifestyle to determine what the problem might be? Are there particular methods you prefer when treating a chronic illness, and why do you prefer them? What role do you see yourself playing in a patient’s health? Are you a scold? A friend? A coach?

 

Once you’ve determined your professional philosophy and values, let them inform your online reputation management strategy. Consider your existing social media profiles, web pages, and blog sites and look for opportunities to display your chosen brand in subtle yet effective ways.

 

Make sure to use some portion of your websites and profiles to clearly outline and explain your professional approach, as well as emphasizing the “why” behind your philosophy as a doctor. Further demonstrate your commitment to your philosophy through the generation of relevant content, as well as linking readers to well-written pieces on reputable websites that you consider to be in line with your approach to healthcare.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How to Increase Patient Engagement

How to Increase Patient Engagement | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

You offer treatment with a motive to cure and satisfy your patient. Your practice is dependent on your patients. A happy patient is a key to the growth of your practice. You need to take various initiatives to increase patient engagement. The clearer your treatments, procedures, and conversations are the stronger will be your doctor-patient relationships. This helps you develop better online reputation for your practice.Below are some mistakes to avoid and creative ways for growing patient engagement and benefitting your practice’s growth.

Mistakes to avoid

For a rock-solid engagement initiative, you need to avoid following mistakes

One-for-all script: You cannot use the same script for all communications. Streamlining your communication efforts help you increase engagement and get you, loyal patients. You need to improvise and customize your script especially when dealing with same patients. Else, you are likely to bore them and face rejections. Since repetitive scripts give insecurity to patients make them feel unimportant and demotivated.

Pushing content: For successful marketing and patient engagement you cannot go with push strategy. You should always broadcast only the required information and don’t overload for engagement. Plan and be clear about your strategies instead of bombarding everything together and confusing patients.

Use newsletters, offers, and surveys to engage your target audience. Remember to check the frequency. Just like too many emails can annoy patients, similarly, very few emails can also make your patients forget about your practice.

Sales on mind: Don’t consider patients as a sales resource. This would make you lose your existing patients assuming you inconsiderate and leaving no scope of re-engagement. You need to increase your patient base but that’s possible only when are successful in retaining your existing patients.

Your patients never wish to be treated as numbers. They want to feel concerned. Any sales focused step can bring in anger and annoyance in search of immediate results. Rewards come with patience.

 

Below are some effective and easy ways to level-up your engagement with your patients.

Feedback: To increase engagement you need to get valuable feedback from your patients. This will help you know what your patients want. If you are not pushy, patients are likely to express their opinion. You can ask for feedback when a patient visits your practice, or you can send a survey email after the patient is done with a treatment. To unsatisfied patients, you can assure improvement and reconnect with them. Feedbacks are a great way to get insights about your patients and build strong relationships.

Customer service: You and your staff should be supportive to your patients. Following an organizational culture develops a friendly environment that helps patients to share their concerns in details. Feeling respected, patients are likely to refer your practice to their friends and family. A nice behavior should be continued from first interaction to the last.

Social media presence: Have a good presence on social media platforms to engage with your existing and potential patients. Showcase your thought leader personality and share your knowledge with all. Join other groups of your niche and broaden your marketing’s wavelength and increase engagement. Use different platforms wisely keeping in mind the type and age of the audience.

Some more creative ways to increase patient engagement are:

  • Ask for recommendations
  • Send daily medication reminders
  • Have an engaging patient portal where they can schedule appointment online and check their reports
  • Recommend mHealth app that includes fun and knowledge
  • Get a mobile-friendly website
  • Share your videos on YouTube
  • Use different forms of content such as infographics, videos, images, podcasts, etc.
  • Participate in seminars and local community activities or host an open house to interact with more new patients.
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care

24 Outstanding Statistics on How Social Media has Impacted Health Care | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Social media is one of the most talked about disruptions to marketing in decades, but how is it impactful for the health care industry? In a generation that is more likely to go online to answer general health questions then ask a doctor, what role does social media play in this process? Let’s dive into some meaningful statistics and figures to clearly illustrate how social media has impacted health care in the last few years.

 

1. More than 40% of consumers say that information found via social media affects the way they deal with their health. (source: Mediabistro)

Why this matters: Health care professionals have an obligation to create educational content to be shared across social media that will help accurately inform consumers about health related issues and out shine misleading information. The opinions of others on social media are often trusted but aren’t always accurate sources of insights, especially when it comes to a subject as sensitive as health.

 

2. 18 to 24 year olds are more than 2x as likely than 45 to 54 year olds to use social media for health-related discussions. (source: Mediabistro)

Why this matters: 18 to 24 year olds are early adopters of social media and new forms of communication which makes it important for health care professionals to join in on these conversations where and when they are happening. Don’t move too slow or you risk losing the attention of this generation overtime.

 

3. 90% of respondents from 18 to 24 years of age said they would trust medical information shared by others on their social media networks. (source: Search Engine Watch)

Why this matters: A millennial’s network on social media is a group of people that is well trusted online, which again, presents an opportunity to connect with them as health care professional in a new and authentic way.

 

4. 31% of health care organizations have specific social media guidelines in writing. (source: Institute for Health)

Why this matters: It is crucial to have social media guidelines in place for your health care facility to ensure everyone is on the same page, your staff is aware of limitations to their actions on social media and that a systematic strategy is in place for how social media should be run across your organization.

 

5. 19% of smartphone owners have at least one health app on their phone. Exercise, diet, and weight apps are the most popular types. (source: Demi & Cooper Advertising and DC Interactive Group)

Why this matters: This drives home the need for your health care organization to look into possibly launching a health related app focused on your specialty. This statistic doesn’t mean every health care facility should have their own app, but they should have a strong mobile focus across their marketing no matter their size.

 

6. From a recent study, 54% of patients are very comfortable with their providers seeking advice from online communities to better treat their conditions. (source: Mediabistro)

Why this matters: If the context of a group or community online is high quality and curated, then many trust that crowd sourcing of information from other like mind individuals is reliable. This shows how people perceive the Internet to be beneficial for the exchange of relevant information, even about their health.

 

7. 31% of health care professionals use social media for professional networking. (source: MedTechMedia)

Why this matters: This helps shine a stronger emphasis on the many applications and benefits of social media, one of which being professional development for health care workers from networks like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

 

8. 41% of people said social media would affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital, or medical facility. (source: Demi & Cooper Advertising and DC Interactive Group)

Why this matters: This statistic shows that social media can be a vehicle to help scale both positive and negative word of mouth, which makes it an important channel for an individual or organization in the health care industry to focus on in order to attract and retain patients. Consumers are using social media to discuss everything in their lives including health and it is up to your organization to choose whether it’s time to tune in.

 

9. 30% of adults are likely to share information about their health on social media sites with other patients, 47% with doctors, 43% with hospitals, 38% with a health insurance company and 32% with a drug company. (source: Fluency Media)

Why this matters: Social media is slowly helping improve the way people feel about transparency and authenticity, which will hopefully lead to more productive discussions and innovations regarding an individual’s health.

 

10. 26% of all hospitals in the US participate in social media. (source: Demi & Cooper Advertising and DC Interactive Group)

Why this matters: If your hospital isn’t using social media, then you’re way behind the learning curve. Social media is really important for hospitals to communicate with past, present and future patients, despite the many regulations to what can and can’t be said on behalf of the hospital.

 

11. The most accessed online resources for health related information are: 56% searched WebMD, 31% on Wikipedia, 29% on health magazine websites, 17% used Facebook, 15% used YouTube, 13% used a blog or multiple blogs, 12% used patient communities, 6% used Twitter and 27% used none of the above. (source: Mashable)

Why this matters: Understanding where a majority of consumer health information comes from is important way of knowing of its value, credibility and reliability. It is important to differentiate sources of quality content from other less desirable sources of info.

 

12. Parents are more likely to seek medical answers online, 22% use Facebook and 20% use YouTube. Of non-parents, 14% use Facebook and 12% use YouTube to search for health care related topics. (source: Mashable)

Why this matters: Parents are more concerned about the well-being of their children then they were before having children, therefore they often source more information about a loved one’s health on social media and online more then ever before.

 

13. 60% of doctors say social media improves the quality of care delivered to patients. (source: Demi & Cooper Advertising and DC Interactive Group)

Why this matters: This statistic is important because it shows that many doctors believe that the transparency and authenticity that social media helps spur is actually improving the quality of care provided to patients. Lets hope this is a continuing trend among the industry for patients at all levels.

 

14. 2/3 of doctors are use social media for professional purposes, often preferring an open forum as opposed to a physician-only online community. (source: EMR Thoughts)

Why this matters: It is interesting that a majority of doctors chose a more open forum as opposed to discussion in a health care specific community online. It is a fascinating statistic because it feeds into the same premise that a certain level of transparency spurred by social media is taking ahold of the entire industry.

 

15. YouTube traffic to hospital sites has increased 119% year-over-year. (source: Google’s Think Insights)

Why this matters: Video marketing converts to traffic and leads much more easily than other forms of content because it more effectively gets across the point, shares a human element and is able to highlight the value of the facilities more quickly. Other hospital facilities should look to create video content based around interviews, patient stories and more.

 

16. International Telecommunications Union estimates that global penetration of mobile devices has reached 87% as of 2011. (source: mHealth Watch)

Why this matters: Once again, it’s time to think mobile first, second and third for your healthcare facility. With mobile penetration reaching an all time high, an age of connected devices is on the horizon for many healthcare facilities and it is time to develop a plan.

 

17. 28% of health-related conversations on Facebook are supporting health-related causes, followed by 27% of people commenting about health experiences or updates. (source: Infographics Archive)

Why this matters: This statistic supports and highlights two common uses of Facebook related to your health like sharing your favorite cause or interacting with others recovering. Social media has penetrated our society very deeply to the point where it has become a place where we share our interests and give support to others. This could be one of the many factors affecting why many trust the information found on social media about healthcare. The masses are continually accepting social media as a part of their everyday life, it is time your healthcare facility incorporated this marketing medium as part of your culture as well.

 

18. 60% of social media users are the most likely to trust social media posts and activity by doctors over any other group. (source: Infographics Archive)

Why this matters: Doctors as respected members of society are also highly revered for their opinions when they are shared on social media, which is even more reason to help boost your reach as a healthcare professional and actively use social media to discuss the industry.

 

19. 23% of drug companies have not addressed security and privacy in terms of social media. (source: Mediabistro)

Why this matters: This is an unsettling statistic about privacy concerns with drug companies that drastically needs to be addressed in order to guarantee that sensitive data is not accidentally released to the public on social media. It shows how many companies in health care still don’t know the first thing about the use of social media. This can be corrected by creating clear and concise guidelines on how social media should be used by the organization and its staff.

 

20. The Mayo Clinic’s podcast listeners rose by 76,000 after the clinic started using social media. (source: Infographics Archive)

< p>Why this matters: This is a clear cut example of how to successfully bolster the reach of your organization’s messaging by echoing it appropriately on social media. Mayo Clinic already had a regular podcast that they helped grow by effectively using social media to share content and chat with their audience. Don’t get left behind in the digital age, take this example and run with it.

 

21. 60% of physicians most popular activities on social are following what colleagues are sharing and discussing. (source: Health Care Communication)

Why this matters: Many people on social media are passive participants since they aren’t creating or commenting on content, but instead reading and observing the content and conversations of others in their network. This is also true for many doctors that find value using social media to exchange information but don’t always choose to join the conversation. Many doctors are seeing the value of social media, regardless if they are a participant or an observer.

 

22. 49% of those polled expect to hear from their doctor when requesting an appointment or follow-up discussion via social media within a few hours. (source: HealthCare Finance News)

Why this matters: This is a surprising statistic because of how many people are comfortable with connecting with their doctor on social media, as well as how quickly they expect their doctor to personally respond to their outreach. This is a telling sign that the way in which we typically book appointments and handle follow-up conversations after an appointment, will continue to be disrupted by the use of social media in the process.

 

23. 40% of people polled said information found on social media affects how someone coped with a chronic condition, their view of diet and exercise and their selection of a physician.(source: HealthCare Finance News)

Why this matters: The opinion and viewpoints of the people in our social circles online are continuously influencing our decision making even it when it comes to our opinion on healthcare options. Health care professionals should take note of this fact by using social media in an impactful way to ensure they become a part of the process of forming an opinion of a person’s health care options.

 

24. Of more than 1,500 hospitals nationwide who have an online presence, Facebook is most popular. (source: WHPRMS)

Why this matters: The fact that most hospitals use Facebook over other social media channels is important to note because time, staff and budget are always limited and your efforts with social media should be targeted and focused to where your organization can make the most impact.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

10 Reasons Your Healthcare Practice Should Invest in Digital Marketing

10 Reasons Your Healthcare Practice Should Invest in Digital Marketing | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Everyone has heard about the importance of digital marketing in the internet age. Yet for many healthcare professionals, this call to action might come across as vague or overly generalized, seeming to suggest that they should embrace digital strategies simply because everyone else is doing it.

However, adopting a tech-forward approach does offer a number of significant advantages that are unique to the medical industry — here are ten reasons every healthcare marketer should invest in digital marketing:

1. Your Cost Per Patient Acquisition (CPA) is Too High

Many medical practices are still struggling to lower their patient CPA. For example, according to a seminal survey of U.S. vein practices, the most common media channels used are print (68%) and TV (30%), which cost $314 and $348 per patient, respectively. Digital outreach, on the other hand, can cut that overall cost down by as much as 50%, to $149.

Digital strategies consistently reduce marketing spend and increase ROI, regardless of the industry. We were able to reduce one dental practice’s cost per qualified lead by 46%, and their cost per booked appointment by a full 70%.

2. You Need to Target Patients With Specific Conditions

Unlike traditional broadcast and print media, digital marketing enables physicians to target patients by specific condition, age, gender, demographic, or even zip code. According to BIA Kelsey, 97% of consumers use the web to shop locally; with search engine marketing (SEM), marketers can use highly-targeted keywords to reach patients currently looking for specific treatments in their area. Moreover, those targeting conditions can be optimized in real-time, a cost-saving luxury that traditional methods simply don’t afford.

3. You’re Afraid You’re Falling Behind on the Times

The truth is that 98% of businesses are merging their traditional strategies with digital, according to Gartner. Like we said, you should never adopt a trend just because it’s popular; but when it’s a hit with patients too, you may want to reconsider. McKinsey explains how 75% of people want to use digital healthcare services. As AdAge notes, healthcare professionals need to take their business where the patients are, which is online and on mobile devices.

4. You’re Not Using Data to Make Decisions

One drawback of traditional marketing techniques is that they’re hard to track. In fact, GfM explains that data-driven marketing is the top priority for all marketers in 2016. Digital techniques allow physicians to make efficient, data-led marketing decisions; first, try a number of different low-cost ad spends to determine which channels are the most effective, then scale for maximum visibility and impact.

5. Your Brand Doesn’t Show Up in the Search Engines

SEO Hermit explains how 20% of Google searches are health-related, and over 70% of those searches result in a click on the first page (just 5.6% for pages two or three), according to Marketing Land. Getting your name on page one, however, takes some marketing finesse. A well-crafted search engine optimization (SEO) strategy and paid advertising campaigns are your best bet for snagging those top positions and the maximum number of clicks.

6. You Can Engage With People Directly

It’s a myth that digital isn’t personal. In fact, 70% of all phone calls from consumers are driven by digital marketing strategies, such as click-to-call (CTC), as Biz Report explains. Today, this kind of seamless access has become a baseline expectation for patients, with 41% mobile searchers reporting that if their chosen brand has no CTC functionality, they’ll move onto to one that does. What’s more, CTC conversion rates on Google are often as high as 25%, and boast a 51% lower cost than traditional display remarketing, according the Search Engine Watch.

7. You Can Increase Patient Retention

In the digital age, patients value convenience and ease of access above all. By cultivating a watertight digital engagement strategy, patients will easily be able to find your website, up-to-date practice and contact information, or your patient portal, at any time. Your lasting presence matters, too — according to the research from PwC, 41% of patients say that social media engagement will affect their choice of a specific doctor, hospital, or medical facility.

8. You Can Get More Patient Referrals

Digital tools both expand your potential patient pools and lower the cost of engaging them. For example, we’ve been able to drive down referral costs from 20-40%, all while generating an average 20 to 40 referrals a month — some clients see as many as 300. In the vein market, we recently drove our 250,000th digital referral.

9. You Will Improve the Patient Experience

Not only does digital marketing make it easier for patients to find and connect with your medical brand — it improves their experience along the way. With digital tracking systems, you can easily send out reminders, reaching out to them on important dates. Moreover, you can directly address their specific needs by blogging regularly or soliciting their direct feedback through patient satisfaction surveys.

10. Your Marketing Can Be Personalized

Traditional marketing entailed crafting a generalized message for the broadest possible audience. Digital marketing, however, enables healthcare providers to target the individual. Whether by directing your message to “40-year-old multiple sclerosis patients in Coeur d’Alene, ID,” making your content accessible on the devices that consumers — especially millennials — demand to use, or leveraging data to hone your content’s effectiveness, medical practices can personalize their marketing in unprecedented ways.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

How to Start Marketing Your Medical Practice on Facebook

How to Start Marketing Your Medical Practice on Facebook | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The notion that Facebook is an important marketing channel isn’t exactly breaking news — the platform’s 1.94 billion users and projected 39.1% share of the total U.S. display ad revenue in 2017 kind of say it all.

But for physicians and other medical specialists, just getting a Facebook presence up and running (properly) can be a real challenge. If you’re considering investing in Facebook marketing for your practice (or want to revamp your current approach), here are a few tips and tricks to help get you started on the right foot.

Build Your Practice’s “Company Page”

Within the medical community, using a personal Facebook account to represent your brand is often viewed as unprofessional — you’ll want to build an official company page, which will serve as your primary channel for interaction and engagement on the network.

Of course, Facebook outlines the basics of creating an account in its Help Center, but here are a few healthcare-specific tips that will help boost the efficacy of your page:

  1. Make your contact info clear and easy to find: be sure you include your phone number, typical hours of operation, address, and a link to your main website, just like would on a business directory listing or your site’s “Contact Us” page.
  2. Include photos and videos: Facebook users prefer visual-based content. Be sure to provide compelling images and videos that highlight your facilities, staff, and general expertise in your field.
  3. Calls to action (CTAs) are key: the primary goal of your page is to get patients to visit your website and/or call your offices directly. Make sure you’re giving them plenty of opportunities to do so by including clear and highly visible CTAs throughout your page.

Start Generating Content

Before you start promoting or inviting people to your page, you’ll want to make sure it’s well-populated with an interesting array of content. Good Facebook posts typically include a visual element like an image or infographic (as I already mentioned, visual posts tend to outperform text-only ones). If you do include text, try to keep it short and digestible — you don’t want your target audience’s eyes glazing over from a long-winded, technical explanation of a condition or treatment.

A good workaround for this is to use Facebook posts to promote longer-form, onsite content, such as a blog post, interview or podcast. This approach comes with the added benefit of sending more qualified traffic to your site, where there’s an increased chance for conversion.

Connect With Your Target Audience

Start growing your practice’s Facebook fan base by leveraging existing networks — invite current patients, colleagues, and friends to “like” your page so you have a solid foundation of followers Now start linking some of your other on- and offline marketing efforts to your new page. For example, start promoting your Facebook page in your email signature, on your website, and even on informational/promotional brochures.

You can also join and start posting in Facebook groups largely made up of your target patient demographic (for example, if your practices specializes in sports medicine, you could look for local running or health and fitness clubs). Just make sure you’re not being overly advertorial — coming across as “spammy” will likely do more harm than good.

Invest In Facebook Advertising

If you want to boost your Facebook marketing strategy to the next level, you should consider investing in Facebook advertising. Facebook’s advanced ad platform allows you to target patients based on key demographic information (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, geographic location, language, income, and more), as well as their interests (e.g., interests they list on their profiles, specific Pages they like, and other ads they’ve clicked on in the past).

Of course, seeing a positive ROI will require a properly designed, implemented, and actively managed campaign. Just like Google, Facebook’s primary objective is to provide a positive experience for its users, so it’s constantly updating its algorithms and capabilities in accordance with consumer feedback and shifting preferences. In other words, there's no such thing as a set-it-and-forget-it approach. That said, the potential returns on a Facebook campaign make it well worth the effort and investment — you just need to make sure both are being spent in the wisest way possible.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Three Reasons Social Media Should Be a Strategic Priority for Clinical Trials

Three Reasons Social Media Should Be a Strategic Priority for Clinical Trials | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The rise of digital media has revolutionized healthcare, empowering patients to conduct their own medical research and make their own decisions about treatment. Increasingly, clinical trial sponsors and CROs are recognizing this trend and adjusting their recruitment strategies in order to remain in-step with shifting consumer preferences. That “adjustment” has primarily entailed moving away from traditional advertising outlets (TV, radio, print) towards digital marketing channels in order to reach more prospective participants, and to do so in a more targeted, ROI-positive manner.

As social platforms like Facebook have matured and proliferated over the past five to seven years, it’s emerged as a powerful clinical recruitment engine. Here are a few of the key reasons sponsors and CROs should seriously consider adding social media marketing into their digital recruitment strategies.

1. Reaching a Wider Audience

In the past, one of the biggest roadblocks to patient recruitment success has been connecting a large enough number of patients with relevant clinical research opportunities in a cost-effective manner. Traditional media casts a wide net, but in addition to being expensive, there’s no real way of guaranteeing the message will actually reach your desired audience.

Data indicates that the industry’s approach to raising awareness has been largely ineffective. For example, NIH research suggests that some 85% of cancer patients remain unaware of active clinical research opportunities, even though 75% of them say they would be willing to participate if they did. What’s more, the efficacy of traditional tactics for patient education and referrals seems to be diminishing quickly — for example, a recent Tufts CSDD report indicates that only 0.2% doctors and nurses actively refer their patients to clinical trials.

Social media presents an opportunity for sponsors and CROs to reach an absolutely massive audience with the resources and information they need to enroll. For example, Facebook’s user base is now more than two-billion strong, which includes 100% representation for many chronic and/or rare conditions, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

2. Communities and Support

One of the biggest developments associated with the rise of social media is the mass proliferation of online patient communities. A recent Health Union survey of more than 2,200 chronic care patients found that 26% use the platform once or more every day for health, and more than 50% on a monthly basis. Many are looking to condition-specific Facebook pages for guidance and other information from others suffering from the same affliction, in large part because social media users are so vocal about their experiences — even personal ones.

The Health Union study found that approximately 49% of respondents had “posted or shared a personal story or content online and 48% have shared a health-related post, photo or video that was not their own.”

The study explains, “The desire to explain their condition drives most of those who posted or shared content online, along with managing or coping with the symptoms...content that promotes understanding and support for these conditions receive the highest levels of engagement in social media.”

What’s clear is that patients are receptive to the information they come across on social media — as such, clinical trials should make social media engagement a priority in order to increase patient awareness and connect with more potentially qualified participants.

3. Social Media Advertising Works

In any marketing campaign, one of the main factors determining the ROI will be whether or not you can get the right materials in front of the right audience. Unlike traditional print, radio, and television ads, social media advertising platforms like Facebook offer powerful targeting tools that allow clinical trials to reach niche patient segments.

Sponsors and CROs can design campaigns around specific inclusion/exclusion criteria, such as age, sex, ethnicity, geographic location, and demonstrated interests, ensuring that the ads are being shown to only the most qualified candidates and increasing the likelihood of conversion.

At the end of the day, clinical trial sponsors and other stakeholders involved in patient recruitment need to recognize that social media is no longer a novelty. Rather, it’s become an established, trusted resource for consumers looking for health-related information and support. Utilizing it isn’t just about keeping R&D costs under control — it’s about making it easier for patients suffering from serious illnesses to get the information and ultimately, the care they need.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

A Doctor's Reputation Means Everything: How to Protect Yours

A Doctor's Reputation Means Everything: How to Protect Yours | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

What do your patients say about you? For a medical practice, a healthy reputation means growth potential and successful physician marketing, but there is more to it than just fighting off the critics. Doctors need to look for ways to cultivate their online reputations.

Online reputation management is a growing industry, but it is not necessary to hire a firm unless you need to repair significant damage. Consider some simple ways to protect and enhance the online reputation of the practice.

Be Aware

Ongoing monitoring of social media and review sites is a part of responsible reputation management. A negative review immediately creates an impact, so the sooner someone is aware of the problem, the better. Monitor sites like Vitals, Healthgrades, RateMDs, UCompareHealthcare and even Yelp for both positive and negative reviews. When a patient has a positive experience with your practice, ask them to share their experience with the community by posting a review. 

Respond to the Critics

Practices should respond to negative reviews in a positive, not defensive, way. When posting a response, make sure to avoid any HIPAA violation regarding patient privacy. Software Advice points out that no matter what the reviewer says, you cannot publicly acknowledge them as a patient. Avoid specific references to a treatment plan or diagnosis, as well.

You can contact the patient via phone and try to resolve the issue if you know who it is, but do not send them an email using the address listed in the review. If you are able to fix the problem, ask the patient to delete the negative review or post another that is positive to counteract it.

Don’t Be Afraid to Take Legal Action

If the negative comments are libelous or defaming, do whatever is necessary to remove them even if it means legal action. TraverseLegal explains that defamation against medical practices is rampant on the Internet. One well placed comment can negate thousands of dollars spent of physician marketing, too.

Practices should have a plan in place should a libelous review arise that includes hiring a lawyer that specializes in Internet defamation cases.

Cultivate a Positive Internet Presence

Leveraging social media is one way a practice can build a positive Internet presence. Create pages on all the mainstream social networking sites and post to them often. Provide engaging content about trending healthcare topics like managing chronic disease, or showcase the state of the art technology your practice utilizes. Become the local authority within your community for your specialty.

A physician’s reputation is sometimes all they have, especially when just starting out. One mishandled issue, whether true or not, can takes years to repair. Staying proactive about reputation management is just smart business.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Reputation Management For Doctors: What To Do Differently

Reputation Management For Doctors: What To Do Differently | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

To some, online reputation management for doctors may seem unnecessary. If you’re a great doctor, then patients will recommend you and professional opportunities will just happen…right?

This may be true for some – but not most.

According to a recent study conducted by Gaby Loria, “77% of patients start their healthcare search online and 84% of patients read online reviews to evaluate providers.”  

This means that as a physician, there’s a good chance that contact with a patient could begin and end online.  

By ignoring your online presence, you limit your professional reach. You also leave your online image vulnerable to attack or obscurity.

These days, few people will trust their health to a doctor with 1 star ratings.  And absolutely no one wants a healthcare provider with zero information available online!

The statistics support this. According to a 2013 study from Digital Assent, “85% of patients are not comfortable choosing a provider with 1 star for more than 10% of reviews”.

A doctor’s primary concern should be the quality of his or her work. However, it would be professionally irresponsible to turn a blind eye to one’s reputation online. Successful medical practices focus on reputation management for doctors for this exact reason.

As a physician, you owe it to yourself, your patients and colleagues. Ensure that online information about you and your practice is accurate, up to date and informative.

The best approach for doctor reputation management:

The most important thing that you possess is the quality of care that you provide for your patients. And in all likelihood, you are constantly striving to improve your skills and overall knowledge in your field through dealing with patients, conducting research, attending conferences and more.

While this kind of ongoing development is important – how will your patients know about it if you don’t share it?

Again, this is why building an online brand for yourself is critical. Reputation management for doctors relies heavily on general branding principles, with some important tweaks.

Building (or enhancing) your online presence is an ongoing process that requires a customized strategy. This strategy should take into account your ultimate branding goals and what your search results look like currently. However, there are certain steps that everyone should take to create the strongest online foundation possible.

While BrandYourself’s tools and services explain each step in detail,  when it comes to improving how doctors look online, we suggest the following for the best outcome:

Before doing anything, scan and audit your current online presence:

Google your name to see what kinds of search results show up. Search incognito or use a private browsing mode so that the search result rankings are as unbiased as possible. Look through the first few pages to get a sense of how you look when others search for you. Are the search results positive? Are they damaging? Does information about you even show up? Is it relevant for your patients and colleagues? Effective reputation management for doctors relies heavily on this information.

Once you’ve scanned and diagnosed how you look online, go through any social media accounts, professional profiles or websites that you control and delete old posts, comments or photos that may be inappropriate. This includes obvious things like posts that reference sex, drugs, bigotry, sexism, etc.

Additionally, review what you’ve published or commented about polarizing topics like religion or politics. These kinds of posts aren’t necessarily bad, but could damage your reputation to some depending on their own beliefs. Make sure that you stand by what you choose to post online.  If you don’t – delete, delete, delete.

It’s also helpful to know how other doctors in your area appear online. You don’t need to investigate their online reputation religiously, just take a peek so you have a rough idea how things look. You should always strive to have the best online presence as possible and this information will give you additional insight. Practicing reputation management for doctors is always easier when you know where you stand in the pack.

If there’s another doctor in a similar practice that has an amazing online reputation, use him or her as an inspiration in your own digital presence. Closing the gap will only help your practice.

Build high-quality branded sites & profiles you want others to find:

If you want a strong online presence, you need an arsenal of high-quality websites and social profiles that reflect your brand in a professional manner. The goal here is to make your foundation of online properties relevant and helpful to those who might be looking for you.

If you have several unwanted results ranking for your name, or if you have a popular name, then expect to put in more work than if you weren’t facing these obstacles. However, a high level of output isn’t the only factor. Think “high-quality” when it comes to just about everything you control online! If you utilize these sites and profiles properly, you will create a comprehensive resource about you, and eventually outnumber and overwhelm negative or irrelevant content.

Reputation management for doctors is much like any other ORM campaign. The best way to find success with this process is by optimizing correctly and publishing consistently. To start the process of building high-quality sites and profiles:

  1. Purchase your domain name (ie. janedoe.com)
  2. Build your personal website  (we recommend using WordPress)
  3. Join major social networks like Twitter and LinkedIn
  4. Take control of your profile, list your practice, or create your page on doctor-focused sites like: Healthgrades, Zocdoc, RateMDs, etc.(see the next section for more on profiles)

Make sure those properties are search engine optimized:

Solid doctor online reputation management campaigns implement search engine optimization best practices to give your properties the best chance at outranking undesirable search results. Our DIY tool shows you how.

  1. Use your name wherever possible
  2. Create content that’s original and valuable to your audience
  3. Link your best properties together (to learn more, visit BrandYourself University)

Regularly publish content on your sites & profiles:

As long as you own your site and profiles, publish regularly. If your properties look stagnant, Google won’t consider them relevant enough to rank. Consistently publish high-quality, unique content in various formats and share it across your web properties. Over time, this signals to search engines that your properties are trustworthy and should rank higher in the results.

Find your people to grow your audience:

This is related to step 3, and is extremely important. Everything from views to shares, and other forms of social engagement all contribute to higher search rankings. If your content is inconsistent or low-quality, you’ll miss engagement from other users, and likely won’t be able to rank above unwanted results.

Give it time:

It’s no secret that you will need to put a lot of work in upfront before reaping any benefits. Google’s algorithm favors older properties. Unfortunately, new properties are unlikely to outrank more established results immediately. However, publishing new content regularly and garnering social engagement over time will eventually help your property rank higher in search results while aging into favor.

As a doctor, your online presence can position you as a thought leader, determine the success of your practice, and expand your reach when connecting with patients, colleagues and leaders in your field. Take full advantage of these opportunities while protecting your reputation from potentially damaging or irrelevant information online that you can’t control. Reputation management for doctors is a worthwhile investment for your future online.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Growing Consumer Trust In Online, Social And Mobile Advertising

Growing Consumer Trust In Online, Social And Mobile Advertising | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

Growing Consumer Trust in Online, Social and Mobile Advertising

 

The explosion of social networks and consumer-generated media over the last few years continues to have a significant impact on advertising as consumers’ reliance on word-of-mouth in the decision-making process – either from people they know or online consumers they don’t – has increased significantly.

 

Earned media – including recommendations from friends and family – continues to be the most trustworthy source of advertising, with 92 percent (up 18 percent since 2007) of consumers around the world expressing trust in earned media above all other forms of advertising. Online consumer reviews are the second-most trusted source of brand information and messaging, with 70 percent (up 15 percent over four years) of global consumers expressing trust in the platform.

 

Additionally, fifty-eight percent of global online consumers trust messages found on company websites and about half trust email messages that they have opted in to receive.

 

Now, consider how this influences the perception of your Medical Identity online (Internet persona)? How could you leverage this trend and your patient review platform to improve your brand?

 

To consider these possibilities while comparing the relative trust values of different advertising channels, both online and traditional, check out the analysis. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Doctors can establish their online reputation in these 2 ways

Doctors can establish their online reputation in these 2 ways | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

There are two ways that physicians can establish their online reputation. The first way is to use existing physician rating sites. What physician rating sites will do is create a profile page of every single doctor in the United States. This profile will have your name, your contact information, your board certification status, your hospital affiliation, and, of course, some of them allow patients to rate doctors online.

These pages are backed my companies who are experts in search engine optimization, SEO. (That’s the science of ranking high on Google.) Unless you already have a prominent online presence, these pages that get ranked high when your name is Googled can be patients’ first impression of you online. It’s important to go on these sites, claim your profile, make sure that it information is accurate.

A second way to establish your online reputation is to create content about yourself on the web. If you look at a sample Google results page, there are studies showing where readers click on that page.


About a third of readers will click on the very first result. Another third will click on the second or third result. Fewer than 10 percent of readers will even go on to the second page of results, so it’s important to control those top listings of Google when your name is searched for.

We need tools that are powerful in the eyes of Google and allow us to create content about ourselves online. Today, we’re in luck because we have those tools available to us. They are social media platforms: blogs, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube. They get ranked high in Google search engines and give us the flexibility to create content about ourselves online.


Defining ourselves online with social media is the most powerful way to establish our online reputation.

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Pearls for Improving Your Online Reputation

Pearls for Improving Your Online Reputation | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

The Internet has leveled the information playing field, allowing all members of society access to information about their doctors and their health care. Data reported by Credential Protection indicate that specific doctor names are searched dozens of times to over 50 times daily by patients. Often, patients book surgery with a surgeon and then research the doctor after the appointment.


For medicine, the impact of the telecommunication revolution has been profound. What patients find through Google searches and on social media and online review sites can influence the doctor-patient relationship.


Maintaining a successful online reputation requires three basic components: patient capture, patient engagement, and patient retainment. If all of these components are not strong, doctors will lose patients. If patients cannot find you on the Internet, then from their point of view you do not exist, and you fail to capture those patients. If patients do not feel engaged on social media, then you may not be interesting enough for those patients to seek your care. If patients see bad online reviews, then a tarnished online reputation will drive those patients away. In the digital age, doctors must develop a strong online reputation through these three online components.


Because of the ongoing telecommunications evolution, marketing through the Internet, social media, and doctor- review websites is becoming more cost-effective than traditional advertising modalities such as phonebooks, newspapers, magazine, radio, and television. Online review sites such as Yelp! and Angie’s List have become well-known and serve as a new type of word-of-mouth marketing in the digital age. These sites allow users to leave comments about their customer service experiences, products they have purchased, and other information for other people who may be looking for such advice.


Physicians and their practices are not exempt from these online reviews. Sites that allow patients to talk about their experiences at the doctor’s office and recommend (or not recommend) the practice can be helpful or harmful. Glowing reviews can attract new patients. However, negative or unjust reviews posted by competing doctors or disgruntled patients can affect a doctor’s business and professional reputation, potentially leading to lost patients.


Most current online review sites are unsatisfactory because anyone with a valid e-mail account can leave reviews anonymously. Online review websites that depend mainly on advertising dollars often look unprofessional and may even place competitors’ ads alongside doctors’ profiles. Dealing with slanderous or false reviews can be frustrating and time-consuming.


Unfortunately, I have been a victim of slanderous online reviews. After graduating high school, I devoted 17 years of my life studying to become a physician and surgeon, attaining medical and doctoral degrees at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. I have a distinguished curriculum vitae and have dedicated much of my adult life to serving patients in a professional and ethical manner. One day after the grand opening of my private practice, I was attacked online by an anonymous poster who called me a “money grubber” on a third-party online review site. Most likely I was the victim of a competing doctor or disgruntled associate, although I may never know. This insult was applied to me even though I have spent considerable time seeing patients at the Temecula-Murrieta Rescue Mission at no charge, not billing the patients, and giving glasses away at no cost for those who cannot afford them.


You see, therefore, why I say most current online review sites are unregulated and severely unjust, and they can have horrible consequences for doctors. Online review websites are natural magnets for negative reviews. An outstanding doctor who never has angered one patient may receive no positive reviews, but angry patients can be quick to slander their doctors.


The current state of online reviews may make doctors feel helpless, angry, and frustrated. However, there are seven high-impact things you can do to be proactive and fight against defamation of your name, your reputation, and your credentials.


No. 1: Perform reconnaissance. The first step in fighting the war against slanderous reviews is to be educated on what people find when searching your name. Search your name on Google and see what others will see when searching your name. Monitor the websites that appear on the first page of Google. Use Google Alerts to receive automated emails from Google when there is new information about your name on the Internet. Monitor your online presence often.


No. 2: Erect a brick wall. In search engine management, the term brick wall is applied to a technique used to control the presentation of websites people find when searching your name. When patients search “Andrew Doan” on Google, of the more than 17 million search results, I control and monitor the 9 or 10 websites that appear on the first page of the search. Controlling what people find in this way can draw attention away from less-credible doctor-review sites.


No. 3: Use search engine optimization and management. The use of search engine optimization and management can help raise the websites you want to appear higher in search results. One effective way to accomplish this is to add your practice website address to all social media profiles, such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.


In addition, using social media websites such as Facebook can be an effective way to guide patients to your practice and to engage them in a controlled environment. Patients who “like” or comment on your page are helping you broadcast your practice to their personal connections. This is one form of word-of-mouth marketing in the digital age.


No. 4: Be a good, ethical medical professional. This sounds like common sense, but medical professionals may come to feel entitled and forget that being a good doctor means serving other people. Try to serve others with a caring heart, but without expecting anything in return. Remember that it is a privilege to work in the medical

profession and to be employed during these difficult economic times. Learn to love what you do. Unhappy medical professionals will foster unhappy patients, leading to bad online reviews.


No. 5: Encourage patients to post feedback online. Receiving positive reviews is as easy as asking patients to review your services online. The problem is that there are dozens of review websites, and only a fraction of patients will take the time spontaneously to post reviews online. If you don’t ask, most likely patients will not post reviews for you.


No. 6: The solution to pollution is dilution. Negative reviews are not necessarily bad. We all want to be perfect, but in reality nobody is perfect. A study by researchers at the Stanford Graduate School of Business found that in some cases negative publicity can increase sales when a product or company is relatively unknown, simply because it stimulates product awareness.1 Embrace the negative reviews, learn from them, and become a better doctor tomorrow than you were today.


Unfortunately, not all review websites represent true patient reviews; they may be postings by local competitors or slanderous individuals. The solution to negative reviews is not litigation or gag orders, which may expose one to ligation for violating free speech laws, as was seen in a case involving a New York dentist.2 Also, posting of false testimonials to one’s own practice can lead to loss of medical license and a large monetary fine, as occurred in the case of a New York plastic surgeon in 2009.3


The answer to negative reviews is to learn from the review and then accumulate more positive than negative reviews.


No. 7: Encourage the posting of third-party verified reviews. Work with a third-party organization, such as Verified Reviews, that will collect, process, and post reviews on your behalf. One answer to the current review system that naturally attracts negative reviews is to have a credible organization collect, verify, and post reviews to protect both doctor and patients.


First-mover advantage—a marketing term meaning the advantage gained by being the first to take advantage of a particular market segment—is important when encouraging patients to review your medical and professional services. First-mover advantage allows a doctor to accumulate more reviews than the competition.


When patients search for doctors on the Internet, the two most influential factors are the star rating and the number of reviews for a doctor; the higher the star rating and the greater the number of reviews, the greater the competence and value conveyed to patients.

CONCLUSION

The advancement and evolution of information technology is exciting, but it also presents new challenges for physicians and patients. Many patients prefer Internet resources and are likely to use online resources as their primary reference, including searching for, finding, and reviewing doctors. Your online reputation rests in their hands. The advice in this article may help return some of that control to your own.

No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Are You Avoiding Social Media? Maybe You Shouldn't.

Are You Avoiding Social Media? Maybe You Shouldn't. | Online Reputation Management for Doctors | Scoop.it

I'm not a big social media user. I don't tweet or Instagram or Snapchat — I'm only on Facebook so I can see what my kids are posting. I figure my coworkers hear enough from me while we're inside the office that they don't need to know every single thing I'm doing outside of it.

I meet a lot of physicians who feel the same way, who do everything they can to keep their professional and personal lives separate. But I recently read a study that made me think a bit differently.


According to CareerBuilder, 35 percent of employers are less likely to interview candidates they can't find online. And that's not just IT folks or sales employers. Nearly 50 percent of healthcare employers look at social media to screen candidates.


So what does this mean to physicians who are considering a new job? It's time to get online.


Start by googling yourself


Unfortunately, no matter how hard you try to keep your life off the Internet, chances are good you're still there. Take a second and type your name into Google. You might see a link to your current employer, an old photo from an alumni publication, or the minutes associated with political causes you've donated to. And you will certainly see patient reviews — both good and bad — on websites like HealthGrades.com.


Now put yourself in an employer's shoes. What do these Google results say about you? Do they paint a complete picture of you as a physician? Do they highlight your skills? Your professional accomplishments? Your rapport with patients?


If not, you've got some work to do.


Find the right type of social network


Not all social media networks are created equal. Facebook is great for sharing pictures and stories with those you're close with. Twitter is good if you want to interact with strangers or weigh in on issues in real time. But if you're looking to create a professional profile, I recommend you start with LinkedIn.


LinkedIn is a great place to tell your story. Not only can it house your resume, but it also allows you the freedom to bring your CV to life. You can highlight professional accomplishments, share why you're passionate about medicine, or promote your research. It also allows you to reconnect with former colleagues or friends from medical school who could help you get the inside track on a new position.


Once your profile is complete, potential employers can easily find you online and get a quick snapshot of both your professional experience and who you are as a person. And most importantly — as opposed to online review sites — you control the message.


LinkedIn is not the only option. ZocDoc and Vitals also allow physicians to create a custom profile with photos, credentials, and accomplishments. Because these sites are targeted at consumers, they also include patient ratings.


Be careful of what you share


If you're looking for a new job, or just want to have an impact on what people see when they Google your name, having a social media presence may be a good idea. But once you're online, make sure to think before you post. HIPAA regulations apply on social media, too, so never reveal names of patients you're treating or post photos of things that could identify them; e.g., charts, notes, or X-rays.


It's also smart to keep things positive. A lot of people use social media to vent about their job, boss, or coworkers. Even if these messages never get back to the involved parties, they can be a real turnoff to potential employers.


When in doubt, keep it simple. Maintaining a succinct professional profile on one or two social networks will allow employers to easily find you online and help you present your best self to your next boss.

No comment yet.